The Big Ideas of 2012

The American Dream

I have no deviant desires.
The American Dream
Brent Humphreys

Available in: English, Español, Français, Türkçe.

I am married and I live in the suburbs.

My street looks like every street you have seen in every commercial since 1957.Ever since I first came here, I couldn’t think of living anywhere else.

I have two children – both bright – a girl and a boy. I can’t wait to watch them grow up.

I love my car. My impeccable home. I love being fit, and I love a good day’s work. I love being straight and never confused about my sexual identity. I love my wife. I love being monogamous.

I love my neighbors who come out on Saturday mornings and cut their grass, and chitchat to me while we washdown our cars and driveways.

Every second Saturday, after the kids are safely off to bed, I take a Viagra. My wife and I will then finish watching our Saturday night crime drama, and then for the next 20 or so minutes I remind my wife of why she really married me in the first place. After which she usually takes a Sleep Eze-type product because she says she likes getting a good Saturday night sleep.

The kids are always up early on Sunday mornings, diligently doing their homework at the kitchen table, while Mom bakes cookies and makes bread in her new breadmaker. That’s when the kitchen really shines. We don’t go to church, except for the high holidays, but we still know we are blessed.

My wife booked us a trip to the Caribbean. She said we could get double airmiles if we put the entire trip on our VISA card.

When our neighbors ask how the trip was I tell them it was brilliant, just as theirs had been. It’s not a lie.

Sure, we all comb our hair the same way, and we are a little obsessed with dandelions and flossing our teeth. And so what if we all like to go to the same movies, watch the same TV, and eat the same popcorn. It’s a good life here.

Uncomplicated.

I’m not a complicated man.

I have no deviant desires.

—Sherwood Hinze

232 comments on the article “The American Dream”

Displaying 61 - 70 of 232

Page 7 of 24

Chris Honeycutt

Case in point:

The people above could be:

A) Discussing the movement

B) Discussing the poem
(Including: What does it mean? Or... why is "fi" deleted from each word that begins with those letters, e.g. "fit," "first," "finish." Editorial error or purposeful by the poet?)

C) Discussing the American Dream

But what are they doing?

D) "Tee-hee. It seems likely that the author of the poem had sex with a student. This is scandalous as it has never happened before in human history."

Chris Honeycutt

Case in point:

The people above could be:

A) Discussing the movement

B) Discussing the poem
(Including: What does it mean? Or... why is "fi" deleted from each word that begins with those letters, e.g. "fit," "first," "finish." Editorial error or purposeful by the poet?)

C) Discussing the American Dream

But what are they doing?

D) "Tee-hee. It seems likely that the author of the poem had sex with a student. This is scandalous as it has never happened before in human history."

Anonymous

The "poem" is tripe. The Ray Liotta character in Goodfellas did a better job of lamenting the subjective blandness of suburban life. People can decide for themselves whether to take it or leave it. This ground had already been covered over 50 years ago when Kerouac talked about families in their living rooms gathered around "the One Eye."

The problem with the updated version of this very old meme is the misanthrope and the need to disrupt other people's lives because you don't agree with them.

If Hinze feels that society has treated him unfairly because of a sexual inclination towards minors, perhaps he should say it. Pseudo-poetic, derivative hit pieces against the square life aren't likely to get his message out to anyone outside the ideological dregs he's mired in now.

Anonymous

The "poem" is tripe. The Ray Liotta character in Goodfellas did a better job of lamenting the subjective blandness of suburban life. People can decide for themselves whether to take it or leave it. This ground had already been covered over 50 years ago when Kerouac talked about families in their living rooms gathered around "the One Eye."

The problem with the updated version of this very old meme is the misanthrope and the need to disrupt other people's lives because you don't agree with them.

If Hinze feels that society has treated him unfairly because of a sexual inclination towards minors, perhaps he should say it. Pseudo-poetic, derivative hit pieces against the square life aren't likely to get his message out to anyone outside the ideological dregs he's mired in now.

Chris Honeycutt

Have never seen Goodfellas, have never read Kerouac. (Good spelling, btw.) Know a lot of people who have claimed to enjoy both, but I know a lot of people who claim to enjoy a lot of things.

No, it's not particularly "deep," definately not introspective, far too literal (absolutely no symbolism whatsoever.)

However, there is a virtue in creating to create, and when it comes to amature writing, this guy is pretty okay.

The best book I've read recently on the subject of modern helplessness, conformity and its associated despondency is Ishiguro's "Never Let Me Go." I haven't seen the movie for "Never Let Me Go," but based on people's interpretation of "Remains of the Day" based on the movie, I'd guess they only bear a passing resemblance (and don't even get me started on "I Am Legend"... {shudder.})

Chris Honeycutt

Have never seen Goodfellas, have never read Kerouac. (Good spelling, btw.) Know a lot of people who have claimed to enjoy both, but I know a lot of people who claim to enjoy a lot of things.

No, it's not particularly "deep," definately not introspective, far too literal (absolutely no symbolism whatsoever.)

However, there is a virtue in creating to create, and when it comes to amature writing, this guy is pretty okay.

The best book I've read recently on the subject of modern helplessness, conformity and its associated despondency is Ishiguro's "Never Let Me Go." I haven't seen the movie for "Never Let Me Go," but based on people's interpretation of "Remains of the Day" based on the movie, I'd guess they only bear a passing resemblance (and don't even get me started on "I Am Legend"... {shudder.})

Anonymous

Well, I recommend Dharma Bums. Kerouac's vision of a peaceful "revolution of rucksack wanderers" is far more inspiring to me than the Kalle Lasn's dreams of disruption and militancy.

Anonymous

Well, I recommend Dharma Bums. Kerouac's vision of a peaceful "revolution of rucksack wanderers" is far more inspiring to me than the Kalle Lasn's dreams of disruption and militancy.

Chris Honeycutt

Hm. Not entirely certain what Kalle Lasn's dreams are. One of the reasons I came here was to find out.

I would like to read Dharma Bums. However, I have no one to discuss it with when I do read it.

I'm trying to someone I can prod into reading a bit of Foucault, as his philosophy seems to be a base inspiration of the modern movement (probably will read him anyways for that reason.)

The last philosophy that someone recommended (who claimed to have read it and said he would discuss it) was Derrida's "Gift of Death." Oh, yikes. I like philosophy - Pascal's Pensees rings with me, as does a lot of both Nietzsche and Teilhard - but a huge percentage of Derrida was literal blather.

Chris Honeycutt

Hm. Not entirely certain what Kalle Lasn's dreams are. One of the reasons I came here was to find out.

I would like to read Dharma Bums. However, I have no one to discuss it with when I do read it.

I'm trying to someone I can prod into reading a bit of Foucault, as his philosophy seems to be a base inspiration of the modern movement (probably will read him anyways for that reason.)

The last philosophy that someone recommended (who claimed to have read it and said he would discuss it) was Derrida's "Gift of Death." Oh, yikes. I like philosophy - Pascal's Pensees rings with me, as does a lot of both Nietzsche and Teilhard - but a huge percentage of Derrida was literal blather.

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