The Big Ideas of 2012

The American Dream

I have no deviant desires.
The American Dream
Brent Humphreys

Available in: English, Español, Français, Türkçe.

I am married and I live in the suburbs.

My street looks like every street you have seen in every commercial since 1957.Ever since I first came here, I couldn’t think of living anywhere else.

I have two children – both bright – a girl and a boy. I can’t wait to watch them grow up.

I love my car. My impeccable home. I love being fit, and I love a good day’s work. I love being straight and never confused about my sexual identity. I love my wife. I love being monogamous.

I love my neighbors who come out on Saturday mornings and cut their grass, and chitchat to me while we washdown our cars and driveways.

Every second Saturday, after the kids are safely off to bed, I take a Viagra. My wife and I will then finish watching our Saturday night crime drama, and then for the next 20 or so minutes I remind my wife of why she really married me in the first place. After which she usually takes a Sleep Eze-type product because she says she likes getting a good Saturday night sleep.

The kids are always up early on Sunday mornings, diligently doing their homework at the kitchen table, while Mom bakes cookies and makes bread in her new breadmaker. That’s when the kitchen really shines. We don’t go to church, except for the high holidays, but we still know we are blessed.

My wife booked us a trip to the Caribbean. She said we could get double airmiles if we put the entire trip on our VISA card.

When our neighbors ask how the trip was I tell them it was brilliant, just as theirs had been. It’s not a lie.

Sure, we all comb our hair the same way, and we are a little obsessed with dandelions and flossing our teeth. And so what if we all like to go to the same movies, watch the same TV, and eat the same popcorn. It’s a good life here.

Uncomplicated.

I’m not a complicated man.

I have no deviant desires.

—Sherwood Hinze

232 comments on the article “The American Dream”

Displaying 171 - 180 of 232

Page 18 of 24

danieldcameron

"I'm sure with a little more respect you guys could get your message across, because you have valid points."

Agreed. You catch more flies with honey than vinegar. However, this goes against the militaristic rhetoric which goes on this site. No one here is a revolutionary who is going to throw rocks or molotov cocktails at policemen a la arab spring, but shouting down wal-mart shoppers makes their dicks hard.

Dan

danieldcameron

"I'm sure with a little more respect you guys could get your message across, because you have valid points."

Agreed. You catch more flies with honey than vinegar. However, this goes against the militaristic rhetoric which goes on this site. No one here is a revolutionary who is going to throw rocks or molotov cocktails at policemen a la arab spring, but shouting down wal-mart shoppers makes their dicks hard.

Dan

superego101

The positive expression of the real, of myth, of moral value conceals as it reveals the opposite in all its forms, as much in the published account as the comments here and abroad. We are finite beings with limited time; this, we all may accept. And so we may feel compelled to look for answers that "solve the problem" in a timely way. But are we not our own worst "problem"? When we choose to accept a totalizing narrative, i.e., this is the real (with justification or otherwise), do we not also exclude what we deny: all the possible alternatives? The written words on this (web)page have enlightened us to respond, to interact with what possible meanings may be had. One is clear: a 'fictional confession of normalcy' can engage us, here, to think, interact, and respond in the empty space left for us. What we do with the space, as it grows and coalesces, is one such activity the confessor lacks, and from our larger perspective that 'normal life' is unsatisfactory.The denial we live with excludes alternatives, and at the micro-level, dispersed and realized by myths, there's a syndicated power structure that prohibits the possibility of even questioning the status quo-- individual denial as normalcy, as indisputable, public good. As a remedy, one might ask another, "about what are you in denial?"

superego101

The positive expression of the real, of myth, of moral value conceals as it reveals the opposite in all its forms, as much in the published account as the comments here and abroad. We are finite beings with limited time; this, we all may accept. And so we may feel compelled to look for answers that "solve the problem" in a timely way. But are we not our own worst "problem"? When we choose to accept a totalizing narrative, i.e., this is the real (with justification or otherwise), do we not also exclude what we deny: all the possible alternatives? The written words on this (web)page have enlightened us to respond, to interact with what possible meanings may be had. One is clear: a 'fictional confession of normalcy' can engage us, here, to think, interact, and respond in the empty space left for us. What we do with the space, as it grows and coalesces, is one such activity the confessor lacks, and from our larger perspective that 'normal life' is unsatisfactory.The denial we live with excludes alternatives, and at the micro-level, dispersed and realized by myths, there's a syndicated power structure that prohibits the possibility of even questioning the status quo-- individual denial as normalcy, as indisputable, public good. As a remedy, one might ask another, "about what are you in denial?"

Anonymous

Then again, I do agree with a lot you have to say. I understand that nothing will be changed if nobody enacts upon the issue, and I do agree that the measures have to be rather aggressive. Whether you may fulfill many of these accomplishments on not, why is it upon yourself to hinder the lives of the 'average' person? I think it takes a lot of courage to make your stance, but it also reflects on you how you go about doing that. It takes a certain amount of maturity to come to terms with what the 'ideal' life may be, but what may be right to one, may not be right to some.

I am not trying to argue your points, and I am not looking for arrogant replies in efforts of proving me wrong. I understand that you have many good points, but it is all left up to a persons own interpretation. I understand that even through history things haven't been accomplished by sitting around, but before drastic acts begin, wouldn't a sense of awareness and respect towards others go further then acts of aggression?

There are other substitutes to the way we all go about our everyday lives, and there are things that need to be changed. But going about it in a positive manner, shines brightly upon you. I have seen some violent protests in Toronto, even during the g20. However the truth of the matter is, the people who had peaceful protests, had the attention diverted from them unto the vandals whom were trying to prove a cause, and who really understood what their cause was?

All I am saying is maybe we could accomplish more being respectful and sensible.

Anonymous

Then again, I do agree with a lot you have to say. I understand that nothing will be changed if nobody enacts upon the issue, and I do agree that the measures have to be rather aggressive. Whether you may fulfill many of these accomplishments on not, why is it upon yourself to hinder the lives of the 'average' person? I think it takes a lot of courage to make your stance, but it also reflects on you how you go about doing that. It takes a certain amount of maturity to come to terms with what the 'ideal' life may be, but what may be right to one, may not be right to some.

I am not trying to argue your points, and I am not looking for arrogant replies in efforts of proving me wrong. I understand that you have many good points, but it is all left up to a persons own interpretation. I understand that even through history things haven't been accomplished by sitting around, but before drastic acts begin, wouldn't a sense of awareness and respect towards others go further then acts of aggression?

There are other substitutes to the way we all go about our everyday lives, and there are things that need to be changed. But going about it in a positive manner, shines brightly upon you. I have seen some violent protests in Toronto, even during the g20. However the truth of the matter is, the people who had peaceful protests, had the attention diverted from them unto the vandals whom were trying to prove a cause, and who really understood what their cause was?

All I am saying is maybe we could accomplish more being respectful and sensible.

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