Apocalyptic Boredom

Chris Hedges's Endgame Strategy

Why the revolution must start in America.
Tyler Hicks / Redux / The New York Times

Tyler Hicks / Redux / The New York Times

Audio version read by George Atherton – Right-click to download

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The unrest in the Middle East, the convulsions in Ivory Coast, the hunger sweeping across failed states such as Somalia, the freak weather patterns and the systematic unraveling of the American empire do not signal a lurch toward freedom and democracy but the catastrophic breakdown of globalization. The world as we know it is coming to an end. And what will follow will not be pleasant or easy.

The bankrupt corporate power elite, who continue to serve the dead ideas of unfettered corporate capitalism, globalization, profligate consumption and an economy dependent on fossil fuels, as well as endless war, have proven incapable of radically shifting course or responding to our altered reality. They react to the great unraveling by pretending it is not happening. They are desperately trying to maintain a doomed system of corporate capitalism. And the worse it gets the more they embrace, and seek to make us embrace, magical thinking. Dozens of members of Congress in the United States have announced that climate change does not exist and evolution is a hoax. They chant the mantra that the marketplace should determine human behavior, even as the unfettered and unregulated marketplace threw the global economy into a seizure and evaporated some $40 trillion in worldwide wealth. The corporate media retreats as swiftly from reality into endless mini-dramas revolving around celebrities or long discussions about the inane comments of a Donald Trump or a Sarah Palin. The real world – the one imploding in our faces – is ignored.

The deadly convergence of environmental and economic catastrophe is not coincidental. Corporations turn everything, from human beings to the natural world, into commodities they ruthlessly exploit until exhaustion or death. The race of doom is now between environmental collapse and global economic collapse. Which will get us first? Or will they get us at the same time?

Carbon emissions continue to soar upward, polar ice sheets continue to melt at an alarming rate, hundreds of species are vanishing, fish stocks are being dramatically depleted, droughts and floods are destroying cropland and human habitat across the globe, water sources are being poisoned, and the great human migration from coastlines and deserts has begun. As temperatures continue to rise huge parts of the globe will become uninhabitable. The continued release of large quantities of methane, some scientists have warned, could actually asphyxiate the human species. And accompanying the assault on the ecosystem that sustains human life is the cruelty and stupidity of unchecked corporate capitalism that is creating a global economy of masters and serfs and a world where millions will be unable to survive.

We continue to talk about personalities – Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama or Stephen Harper – although the heads of state and elected officials have become largely irrelevant. Corporate lobbyists write the bills. Lobbyists get them passed. Lobbyists make sure you get the money to be elected. And lobbyists employ you when you get out of office. Those who hold actual power are the tiny elite who manage the corporations. The share of national income of the top 0.1 percent of Americans since 1974 has grown from 2.7 to 12.3 percent. One in six American workers may be without a job. Some 40 million Americans may live in poverty, with tens of millions more living in a category called “near poverty.” Six million people may be forced from their homes in the United States because of foreclosures and bank repossessions. But while the masses suffer, Goldman Sachs, one of the financial firms most responsible for the evaporation of $17 trillion in wages, savings and wealth of small investors and shareholders in the United States, is giddily handing out $17.5 billion in compensation to its managers, including $12.6 million to its CEO, Lloyd Blankfein.

The massive redistribution of wealth happened because lawmakers and public officials were, in essence, hired to permit it to happen. It was not a conspiracy. The process was transparent. It did not require the formation of a new political party or movement. It was the result of inertia by our political and intellectual class, which in the face of expanding corporate power found it personally profitable to facilitate it or look the other way. The armies of lobbyists, who write the legislation, bankroll political campaigns and disseminate propaganda, have been able to short-circuit the electorate.

Our political vocabulary continues to sustain the illusion of participatory democracy. The Democrats and the Liberal Party in Canada offer minor palliatives and a feel-your-pain language to mask the cruelty and goals of the corporate state. Neofeudalism will be cemented into place whether it is delivered by Democrats and the Liberals, who are pushing us there at 60 miles an hour, or by Republicans and the Conservatives, who are barreling toward it at 100 miles an hour.

“By fostering an illusion among the powerless classes that it can make their interests a priority,” Sheldon Wolin writes, “the Democratic Party pacifies and thereby defines the style of an opposition party in an inverted totalitarian system.” The Democrats and the Liberals are always able to offer up a least-worst alternative while, in fact, doing little or nothing to thwart the march toward corporate collectivism. 

It is not that the public in the United States does not want a good healthcare system, programs that provide employment, quality public education or an end to Wall Street’s looting of the U.S. Treasury. Most polls suggest Americans do. But it has become impossible for most citizens in these corporate states to find out what is happening in the centers of power. Television news celebrities dutifully present two opposing sides to every issue, although each side is usually lying. The viewer can believe whatever he or she wants to believe. Nothing is actually elucidated or explained. The sound bites by Republicans or Democrats, the Liberals or the Conservatives, are accepted at face value. And once the television lights are turned off, the politicians go back to the business of serving business.

Human history, rather than being a chronicle of freedom and democracy, is characterized by ruthless domination. Our elites have done what all elites do. They have found sophisticated mechanisms to thwart popular aspirations, disenfranchise the working and increasingly the middle class, keep us passive and make us serve their interests. The brief democratic opening in our society in the early 20th century, made possible by radical movements, unions and a vigorous press, has again been shut tight. We were mesmerized by political charades, cheap consumerism, spectacle and magical thinking as we were ruthlessly stripped of power. 

Adequate food, clean water and basic security are now beyond the reach of half the world’s population. Food prices have risen 61 percent globally since December 2008, according to the International Monetary Fund. The price of wheat has exploded, more than doubling in the last eight months to $8.56 a bushel. When half of your income is spent on food, as it is in countries such as Yemen, Egypt, Tunisia, Somalia and Ivory Coast, price increases of this magnitude bring with them widespread malnutrition and starvation. Food prices in the United States have risen over the past three months at an annualized rate of five percent. There are some 40 million poor in the United States who devote 35 percent of their after-tax incomes to pay for food. As the cost of fossil fuel climbs, as climate change continues to disrupt agricultural production and as populations and unemployment swell, we will find ourselves convulsed in more global and domestic unrest. Food riots and political protests will be frequent, as will malnutrition and starvation. Desperate people employ desperate measures to survive. And the elites will use the surveillance and security state to attempt to crush all forms of popular dissent.

The last people who should be in charge of our food supply or our social and political life, not to mention the welfare of sick children, are corporate capitalists and Wall Street speculators. But none of this is going to change until we turn our backs on the wider society, denounce the orthodoxies peddled in our universities and in the press by corporate apologists and construct our opposition to the corporate state from the ground up. It will not be easy. It will take time. And it will require us to accept the status of social and political pariahs, especially as the lunatic fringe of our political establishment steadily gains power as the crisis mounts. The corporate state has nothing to offer the left or the right but fear. It uses fear to turn the population into passive accomplices. And as long as we remain afraid, or believe that the formal mechanisms of power can actually bring us real reform, nothing will change.

It does not matter, as writers such as John Ralston Saul have pointed out, that every one of globalism’s promises has turned out to be a lie. It does not matter that economic inequality has gotten worse and that most of the world’s wealth has become concentrated in a few hands. It does not matter that the middle class – the beating heart of any democracy – is disappearing and that the rights and wages of the working class have fallen into precipitous decline as labor regulations, protection of our manufacturing base and labor unions have been demolished. It does not matter that corporations have used the destruction of trade barriers as a mechanism for massive tax evasion, a technique that allows conglomerates such as General Electric or Bank of America to avoid paying any taxes. It does not matter that corporations are exploiting and killing the ecosystem for profit. The steady barrage of illusions disseminated by corporate systems of propaganda, in which words are often replaced with music and images, are impervious to truth. Faith in the marketplace replaces for many faith in an omnipresent God. And those who dissent are banished as heretics.

The aim of the corporate state is not to feed, clothe or house the masses but to shift all economic, social and political power and wealth into the hands of the tiny corporate elite. It is to create a world where the heads of corporations make $900,000 an hour and four-job families struggle to survive. The corporate elite achieves its aims of greater and greater profit by weakening and dismantling government agencies and taking over or destroying public institutions. Charter schools, mercenary armies, a for-profit health insurance industry and outsourcing every facet of government work, from clerical tasks to intelligence, feed the corporate beast at our expense. The decimation of labor unions, the twisting of education into mindless vocational training and the slashing of social services leave us ever more enslaved to the whims of corporations. The intrusion of corporations into the public sphere destroys the concept of the common good. It erases the lines between public and private interests. It creates a world that is defined exclusively by naked self-interest.

Many of us are seduced by childish happy talk. Who wants to hear that we are advancing not toward a paradise of happy consumption and personal prosperity but toward disaster? Who wants to confront a future in which the rapacious and greedy appetites of our global elite, who have failed to protect the planet, threaten to produce widespread anarchy, famine, environmental catastrophe, nuclear terrorism and wars for diminishing resources? Who wants to shatter the myth that the human race is evolving morally, that it can continue its giddy plundering of nonrenewable resources and its hedonistic levels of consumption, that capitalist expansion is eternal and will never cease?

Dying civilizations often prefer hope, even absurd hope, to truth. It makes life easier to bear. It lets them turn away from the hard choices ahead to bask in a comforting certitude that God or science or the market will be their salvation. This is why these apologists for globalism continue to find a following. And their systems of propaganda have built a vast, global Potemkin village to entertain us. The tens of millions of impoverished Americans, whose lives and struggles rarely make it onto television, are invisible. So are most of the world’s billions of poor, crowded into fetid slums. We do not see those who die from drinking contaminated water or being unable to afford medical care. We do not see those being foreclosed from their homes. We do not see the children who go to bed hungry. We busy ourselves with the absurd.

The game is over. We lost. The corporate state will continue its inexorable advance until two-thirds of the nation and the planet is locked into a desperate, permanent underclass. Most of us will struggle to make a living while the Blankfeins and our political elites wallow in the decadence and greed of the Forbidden City and Versailles. These elites do not have a vision. They know only one word: more.  They will continue to exploit the nation, the global economy and the ecosystem. And they will use their money to hide in gated compounds when it all implodes. Do not expect them to take care of us when it starts to unravel. We will have to take care of ourselves. We will have to rapidly create small, monastic communities where we can sustain and feed ourselves. It will be up to us to keep alive the intellectual, moral and cultural values the corporate state has attempted to snuff out. It is either that or become drones and serfs in a global corporate dystopia. It is not much of a choice. But at least we still have one.

Chris Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize–winning author and former international correspondent for the New York Times. His latest book is The World As It Is: Dispatches on the Myth of Human Progress.

172 comments on the article “Chris Hedges's Endgame Strategy”

Displaying 51 - 60 of 172

Page 6 of 18

Anonymous

tired, hungry.

Same upbringing, but in southern california. Not so much MATERIALISTIC, but just materialistic and apathetic ENOUGH / (mixed with nationalism) to drift away. My depression started around 15, in and out of mental (behavioral) hospitals, medicated, disassociated, and almost pulled a "columbine" on my high school with my best friend. Not exactly your typical coming of age story. :(

Fast forward a decade of exploitation, economic /social collapse, war lies etc. and I believe we are starting to realize we are a trashed and forgotten, raped generation. truly exploited, truly valueless, faceless cold war kids, born to consume, or die. literally.

revolution is now friends,
we MUST.
i cant see you, ive never met you,
but i will be hearing you as we fight.

Anonymous

tired, hungry.

Same upbringing, but in southern california. Not so much MATERIALISTIC, but just materialistic and apathetic ENOUGH / (mixed with nationalism) to drift away. My depression started around 15, in and out of mental (behavioral) hospitals, medicated, disassociated, and almost pulled a "columbine" on my high school with my best friend. Not exactly your typical coming of age story. :(

Fast forward a decade of exploitation, economic /social collapse, war lies etc. and I believe we are starting to realize we are a trashed and forgotten, raped generation. truly exploited, truly valueless, faceless cold war kids, born to consume, or die. literally.

revolution is now friends,
we MUST.
i cant see you, ive never met you,
but i will be hearing you as we fight.

Anonymous

I can empathize with your message. Beautifully put, we really were cold war kids born to consume, left in front the tv for hours and hours and hours, watching so much bullshit, then sent to schools almost completely void of the kind of love and attention we needed

Anonymous

I can empathize with your message. Beautifully put, we really were cold war kids born to consume, left in front the tv for hours and hours and hours, watching so much bullshit, then sent to schools almost completely void of the kind of love and attention we needed

Anonymised

You have the right to live in freedom, and one important part of that freedom is to be able to live without anyone telling you that you are genetically defective and thus, need powerful, poorly-understood drugs to "correct" and "balance" you, especially not as a teenager! The world of THX 1138 is not far off. But don't lose hope, you are not alone!

The more sensitive among us are an important canary in the mine to the sickness of our society. Anti-depressants are a very effective way of neutering those who might press for undesirable changes.

Anonymised

You have the right to live in freedom, and one important part of that freedom is to be able to live without anyone telling you that you are genetically defective and thus, need powerful, poorly-understood drugs to "correct" and "balance" you, especially not as a teenager! The world of THX 1138 is not far off. But don't lose hope, you are not alone!

The more sensitive among us are an important canary in the mine to the sickness of our society. Anti-depressants are a very effective way of neutering those who might press for undesirable changes.

Anonymous

I'm one of those sensitive ones. However, a history of depression on both sides of my family have left me with a predisposition toward suicidal depression. Those poorly understood drugs have saved my life multiple times. I take them now. They do not neuter or numb me. I am very vocal in pressing for change and have been an activist since the early 70s. I do get depressed over the state of things, but it's a different kind of depression than a clinical depression. So please don't diss those drugs. They can be overused by physicians who don't prescribe them for the right reasons, but there are those of us who actually need them. Thanks.

Pam

Anonymous

I'm one of those sensitive ones. However, a history of depression on both sides of my family have left me with a predisposition toward suicidal depression. Those poorly understood drugs have saved my life multiple times. I take them now. They do not neuter or numb me. I am very vocal in pressing for change and have been an activist since the early 70s. I do get depressed over the state of things, but it's a different kind of depression than a clinical depression. So please don't diss those drugs. They can be overused by physicians who don't prescribe them for the right reasons, but there are those of us who actually need them. Thanks.

Pam

Anonymous

Hello brother,

I know what you mean, I lived that as well. I know now that I wasn't depressed, I was having a normal reaction to the realization that what was going on around me in the world was horrific. My hyper-empathy certainty didn't help, I had no one to direct my anger towards since I felt sad for the victim and the bully.....I can't believe my parents put so many toxic substances in my body under the justification that it was medicine. I see that they now have commercials for dangerous antipsychotics and they are targeting people not with psychosis....but depression.
step out of the shadows in what way?

Anonymous

Hello brother,

I know what you mean, I lived that as well. I know now that I wasn't depressed, I was having a normal reaction to the realization that what was going on around me in the world was horrific. My hyper-empathy certainty didn't help, I had no one to direct my anger towards since I felt sad for the victim and the bully.....I can't believe my parents put so many toxic substances in my body under the justification that it was medicine. I see that they now have commercials for dangerous antipsychotics and they are targeting people not with psychosis....but depression.
step out of the shadows in what way?

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