Whole Brain Catalog

Adbusters G20 Jam

A message to economics students all over the world.
Photo by Joe Sheffer via Flickr

Photo by Joe Sheffer via Flickr

We are a colony of maggots, feeding on nature’s bloated corpse while economic policy makers soothe our troubled minds with lies. Not to worry, they tell us, we’re pulling out of this recession, we’re making progress – the key is more liquidity, more stimulus, more credit, more consumption, more growth.

The time has come to call their bluff.

We need to band together and challenge this powerful intellectual army, whose generals include Greenspan, Summers, Bernanke, Geithner, who have boots on the ground in Blankfein, Buffett, Bloomberg, Straus-Kahn, whose propaganda ministers include Wolf, Friedman, Krugman and textbook authors Samuelson, Nordhaus, Mankiw, and whose foot soldiers are the business and economics professors in universities around the world. Their combined efforts perpetuate the great economic myth of our time: the necessity of ever-increasing growth and consumption, a myth that keeps the ghost ship of consumer capitalism sailing perilously toward certain destruction.

There has never been a better time to wage this meme war. In the aftermath of the meltdown of 2008 (which not even one in a hundred economists saw coming), the profession is demoralized and ripe for a monumental mindshift … the very kind that transformed the science of astronomy 400 years ago, when we suddenly woke up to the fact that the Earth revolves around the Sun and not the other way around. Today, as climate catastrophe looms, threatening the greatest market failure the world has ever seen, we are experiencing another mass awakening. We are beginning to realize that our human money economy is not the center of the world, but rather just a subset of the planetary bioeconomy.

You are feeling restless, the public has grown uneasy, and the internet is buzzing with dissent. The movement to overhaul curricula, pioneer new measures of progress and usher in a true-cost global market regime suddenly feels unstoppable.

Have some fun, whip up debate, slap up posters, invite dissenting guest speakers to address your class and relish the thrill of playing cat and mouse with your professors. We are standing at the beginning of a new era in which a new kind of economy, a sustainable economy, is struggling to be born.

Go to kickitover.org, read some articles, share them with a friend, print some posters and be a part of it.

For the Wild, Kalle

40 comments on the article “Adbusters G20 Jam”

Displaying 11 - 20 of 40

Page 2 of 4

Anonymous

burning cars and smashing windows doesn't say much. sure it's fine to be pissed off at world leaders and corporations but when you smash things and break things what are you saying? what is your message? i watched the riots and couldn't discern what the protesters wanted to convey. Here's and idea...BE DECLARITIVE in what you desire to convey. Organize yourselves accordingly, inspire the masses. All I've seen is people with ideals acting in a boorish manner that does not inpsire, does not ignite change and ultimately you protestors will not be heard in the manner that you wish to be heard in.

Anonymous

burning cars and smashing windows doesn't say much. sure it's fine to be pissed off at world leaders and corporations but when you smash things and break things what are you saying? what is your message? i watched the riots and couldn't discern what the protesters wanted to convey. Here's and idea...BE DECLARITIVE in what you desire to convey. Organize yourselves accordingly, inspire the masses. All I've seen is people with ideals acting in a boorish manner that does not inpsire, does not ignite change and ultimately you protestors will not be heard in the manner that you wish to be heard in.

Anonymous

All this violence and vandalism at WTO events is becoming so cliche and tired. Protesting has become a caricature of itself. "We don't how to revolt in any other way so let's just break shit! It's never affective but it sure is fun, right guys?" This shit doesn't help in anyway. Protests are useless and they've been that way for decades. But keep doing your thing if it makes you happy, if it gives your life a momentary sense of purpose. But to the rest of the world these protests are merely entertainment for some and a small annoyance for others. You're really not making a difference in any way. So why bother?

Anonymous

All this violence and vandalism at WTO events is becoming so cliche and tired. Protesting has become a caricature of itself. "We don't how to revolt in any other way so let's just break shit! It's never affective but it sure is fun, right guys?" This shit doesn't help in anyway. Protests are useless and they've been that way for decades. But keep doing your thing if it makes you happy, if it gives your life a momentary sense of purpose. But to the rest of the world these protests are merely entertainment for some and a small annoyance for others. You're really not making a difference in any way. So why bother?

Annas I. Wibowo

Capitalism is a Disaster

Although it is easy to understand the outrage of the people, it is more important to understand the root cause of the issue. Very often the ills of the system are attributed to greed. However, the problem is much deeper than that. The flaw of the Capitalist system, which emanates from the liberal democratic ideologies, is its Aqeedah (intellectual foundation). During the Middle Ages, European intellectuals fiercely contested the authority of the Church and their efforts culminated in a solution of compromise: the Church was uprooted from the workings of public life and its influence was restricted to the realm of personal life. As a consequence, the human mind became the source of reference for the public domain. That is, man became the sole legislator. With this new-found authority to legislate came the rights to personal freedom, freedom of expression, freedom of thought, and freedom of ownership. The freedom of ownership is the intellectual basis by which the Capitalist elite argue that there should be no regulations or restrictions upon their ability to generate wealth. For example, in 1999 when the American Senator Phil Gramm argued that banks should not be regulated, he stated: "We are here today to repeal Glass-Steagall because we have learned that government is not the answer. We have learned that freedom and competition are the answers". However, the Senator was obviously unable to foresee the future, where the deregulated banks would create subprime mortgages that would undermine the entire system. But this problem is fundamental to legislation by man - he does not have the ability to foresee the full consequences of his actions.

http://www.hizb-america.org/culture/political-analysis/1027-why-so-much-security-for-the-g-20-summit

Annas I. Wibowo

Capitalism is a Disaster

Although it is easy to understand the outrage of the people, it is more important to understand the root cause of the issue. Very often the ills of the system are attributed to greed. However, the problem is much deeper than that. The flaw of the Capitalist system, which emanates from the liberal democratic ideologies, is its Aqeedah (intellectual foundation). During the Middle Ages, European intellectuals fiercely contested the authority of the Church and their efforts culminated in a solution of compromise: the Church was uprooted from the workings of public life and its influence was restricted to the realm of personal life. As a consequence, the human mind became the source of reference for the public domain. That is, man became the sole legislator. With this new-found authority to legislate came the rights to personal freedom, freedom of expression, freedom of thought, and freedom of ownership. The freedom of ownership is the intellectual basis by which the Capitalist elite argue that there should be no regulations or restrictions upon their ability to generate wealth. For example, in 1999 when the American Senator Phil Gramm argued that banks should not be regulated, he stated: "We are here today to repeal Glass-Steagall because we have learned that government is not the answer. We have learned that freedom and competition are the answers". However, the Senator was obviously unable to foresee the future, where the deregulated banks would create subprime mortgages that would undermine the entire system. But this problem is fundamental to legislation by man - he does not have the ability to foresee the full consequences of his actions.

http://www.hizb-america.org/culture/political-analysis/1027-why-so-much-security-for-the-g-20-summit

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