The Post-Postmodernism Issue

McTerror

Courtesy of your favorite clown.
McTerror
ANDREW CAMPBELL

Coulrophobia, the fear of clowns, has an unusually high incidence among young children. Psychologists attribute it to the melding of a clown’s grotesque features with human form. One clown, however, seems to inspire nothing but universal delight in his young fans despite his role in disfiguring “billions and billions” of human forms. A recent study tabulated by the US Center for Disease Control reveals that obesity now officially outranks smoking as the number one killer in the US and the group it’s most affecting is children. Over 30% of American children are classified as obese, putting them at risk for the kinds of diseases that traditionally plague middle-aged adults: heart disease, sleep apnea, diabetes and cancer. Though an increasingly sedentary lifestyle is partly to blame, overconsumption of food high in fat, sugar and salt is the primary culprit. Children weaned on a diet of cheap convenience – like the Happy Meals™ pimped by their favorite clown – are essentially programmed for a lifetime of unhealthy eating habits. And that’s the exact objective a fast-food chain like McDonald’s is trying to achieve, which explains why children are targeted so heavily in their marketing campaigns. Once hooked, children are customers for life. It seems clowns really are evil.

This is the reality, but what are we going to do about it? Is there any way to overthrow the clown?

Staff

56 comments on the article “McTerror”

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Anonymous

We know that McDonald serves unhealthy stuff, yet people still go to eat it. "It tastes good". Does it really? I don't know, I can't say what people think. But I don't know how salt and oil can taste good on my lips, and in my mouth. Nor chicken brought up in unethical conditions or growth hormones that float in my system. "Once in a while is ok", how many once in a while do we have left? What have become of us when we do things with self indulgence as the justification, and what are the consequences?

Anonymous

We know that McDonald serves unhealthy stuff, yet people still go to eat it. "It tastes good". Does it really? I don't know, I can't say what people think. But I don't know how salt and oil can taste good on my lips, and in my mouth. Nor chicken brought up in unethical conditions or growth hormones that float in my system. "Once in a while is ok", how many once in a while do we have left? What have become of us when we do things with self indulgence as the justification, and what are the consequences?

Anonymous

Most people enjoy the taste of salt, sugar and fat; it's a genetic leftover from primitive times when these necessary substances were in short supply. Obviously they are no longer, but they trigger pleasure centers in the brain, as do recreational drugs.

Anonymous

Most people enjoy the taste of salt, sugar and fat; it's a genetic leftover from primitive times when these necessary substances were in short supply. Obviously they are no longer, but they trigger pleasure centers in the brain, as do recreational drugs.

Anonymous

What sets us apart from those who eat at fast food places every day? I used to eat a diet of crap, and when I "woke up" I stopped eating processed foods entirely. I admit that those tastes and flavors excite my tongue(brain), but they do not excite my consciousness.

Is it my realizations about the fast food industry? I know that the food is horrible for you, I know that the food is gained under unethical process. Maybe it's not these realizations, as many people know these facts and yet they still continue to consume. These facts would upset the average human, so why does the average human still poison themselves with pseudo-food? Maybe there is an ulterior motive behind it. Is it the convenience of the 'drive-thru culture', the relative cheapness and easy access to meals, or is it just a cop-out to let the systems change you - not you who changes the system?

I am just trying to understand how such machines can be stopped. Especially one as global as some fast food corporations have become.

Anonymous

What sets us apart from those who eat at fast food places every day? I used to eat a diet of crap, and when I "woke up" I stopped eating processed foods entirely. I admit that those tastes and flavors excite my tongue(brain), but they do not excite my consciousness.

Is it my realizations about the fast food industry? I know that the food is horrible for you, I know that the food is gained under unethical process. Maybe it's not these realizations, as many people know these facts and yet they still continue to consume. These facts would upset the average human, so why does the average human still poison themselves with pseudo-food? Maybe there is an ulterior motive behind it. Is it the convenience of the 'drive-thru culture', the relative cheapness and easy access to meals, or is it just a cop-out to let the systems change you - not you who changes the system?

I am just trying to understand how such machines can be stopped. Especially one as global as some fast food corporations have become.

Barry McD

As little as 2 or 3 generations ago, our ancestors used to wake up at 5am, and work on the farm -- lifting, tugging, hammering, cutting -- very strenuous work that consumed alot of calories. So the high-calorie startchy potatos they ate made sense and were burned off. Now, we eat potatos in the form of french fries -- but we now tap our fingers on our mouses in front of computers for work. That's the most physically demanding thing we do now. So, the article made a mention of it very briefly -- the sendentary lifestyle. But maybe more attention should be put on how radically our lifestyles and workstyles have changed just in the past 100 years. Maybe obesity is linked to work-saving technology, and our bodies and cultural food hasn't had time to keep up with the changes?
Of course it doesn't help McDonalds adds sugar to all it's food so you crave more after awhile -- but everyone's doing that. It's all to increase sales. They all want to make money -- which is related to the economic model we've voluntarily subscribed to called "capitalism".

Barry McD

As little as 2 or 3 generations ago, our ancestors used to wake up at 5am, and work on the farm -- lifting, tugging, hammering, cutting -- very strenuous work that consumed alot of calories. So the high-calorie startchy potatos they ate made sense and were burned off. Now, we eat potatos in the form of french fries -- but we now tap our fingers on our mouses in front of computers for work. That's the most physically demanding thing we do now. So, the article made a mention of it very briefly -- the sendentary lifestyle. But maybe more attention should be put on how radically our lifestyles and workstyles have changed just in the past 100 years. Maybe obesity is linked to work-saving technology, and our bodies and cultural food hasn't had time to keep up with the changes?
Of course it doesn't help McDonalds adds sugar to all it's food so you crave more after awhile -- but everyone's doing that. It's all to increase sales. They all want to make money -- which is related to the economic model we've voluntarily subscribed to called "capitalism".

Alyssa Faller

I am sure that if you eat enough Mc Donalds, it may be possible to give birth to child who ltakes on the characterisitcs of the red man himself. Our lives have become invested in the fast food industry to the point where the old saying mocks us; "you are what you eat."

Alyssa Faller

I am sure that if you eat enough Mc Donalds, it may be possible to give birth to child who ltakes on the characterisitcs of the red man himself. Our lives have become invested in the fast food industry to the point where the old saying mocks us; "you are what you eat."

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