The Post-Postmodernism Issue

Rupture or Rapture?

This millennium-long human adventure of ours may now be reaching a climax.
Rupture or Rapture?

From Greek democracy to Christian love to modernity’s promise of utopia – the human story has been a series of grand narratives, each consuming and evolving beyond the one that came before. Reason eclipsed faith, freedom eclipsed tyranny and industry eclipsed the agrarian way of life.

Transition was not always easy, but even when we stumbled and regressed – enduring bubonic plagues, barbarian invasions and interminable periods of darkness – there was always the unspoken assumption that, through it all, we will persist … that despite all the moral, spiritual and ideological blows, the human story goes on.

But then the world was ablaze in one brutal war after another. We bore witness to the Holocaust, Hiroshima and Nagasaki – a seemingly endless nightmare of genocide, sorrow and sin. We suffered losses of existential capital like never before, and our faith in the inherent goodness of man began to waver. And just as our spiritual house was beginning to crumble, violent fissures tore across our physical world. Ocean levels rose, glaciers melted and the arctic biomass began to release trillions of tons of frozen methane stored over the course of aeons. It suddenly dawned on us that this millennium-long human adventure of ours may be reaching a climax, that over the next few years, we may be living through what could well be humanity’s final rapture moment: peak oil, peak water, peak food, peak everything … even peak sanity and peak TIME!

Not even Nietzsche could have foretold the mystical amalgamation of melancholy, terror and life-affirming ecstasy weaving its way through the last chapters of man.

For the Wild, Kalle

72 comments on the article “Rupture or Rapture?”

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Ryan Fortune

As counterpoint to Kalle's dystopian visions of the future, here is a relatively more hopeful view from Daniel Quinn. Long piece, but seriously well worth the read:

The Little Engine That Couldn't: How We're Preparing Ourselves and Our Children for Extinction.
http://www.ishmael.org/Education/Writings/littletrain.cfm

Ryan Fortune

As counterpoint to Kalle's dystopian visions of the future, here is a relatively more hopeful view from Daniel Quinn. Long piece, but seriously well worth the read:

The Little Engine That Couldn't: How We're Preparing Ourselves and Our Children for Extinction.
http://www.ishmael.org/Education/Writings/littletrain.cfm

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