The Post-Postmodernism Issue

Rupture or Rapture?

This millennium-long human adventure of ours may now be reaching a climax.
Rupture or Rapture?

From Greek democracy to Christian love to modernity’s promise of utopia – the human story has been a series of grand narratives, each consuming and evolving beyond the one that came before. Reason eclipsed faith, freedom eclipsed tyranny and industry eclipsed the agrarian way of life.

Transition was not always easy, but even when we stumbled and regressed – enduring bubonic plagues, barbarian invasions and interminable periods of darkness – there was always the unspoken assumption that, through it all, we will persist … that despite all the moral, spiritual and ideological blows, the human story goes on.

But then the world was ablaze in one brutal war after another. We bore witness to the Holocaust, Hiroshima and Nagasaki – a seemingly endless nightmare of genocide, sorrow and sin. We suffered losses of existential capital like never before, and our faith in the inherent goodness of man began to waver. And just as our spiritual house was beginning to crumble, violent fissures tore across our physical world. Ocean levels rose, glaciers melted and the arctic biomass began to release trillions of tons of frozen methane stored over the course of aeons. It suddenly dawned on us that this millennium-long human adventure of ours may be reaching a climax, that over the next few years, we may be living through what could well be humanity’s final rapture moment: peak oil, peak water, peak food, peak everything … even peak sanity and peak TIME!

Not even Nietzsche could have foretold the mystical amalgamation of melancholy, terror and life-affirming ecstasy weaving its way through the last chapters of man.

For the Wild, Kalle

72 comments on the article “Rupture or Rapture?”

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Anonymous

if we cannot be controlled ... what can we be?....

uncontrollable i think... thats what we are....

Nature can only conlrol itself.. nothing else will do!

Anonymous

if we cannot be controlled ... what can we be?....

uncontrollable i think... thats what we are....

Nature can only conlrol itself.. nothing else will do!

nbng

I approve of environmental collapse in the James lovelock sense: 80-90% of humans dead and gone, mass life extinction, this will leave the overall survivors with a completely new world to make their own- wow! I would love to be part of that but I'll probably be dead like most of us. There will be some real jaw dropping changes to living on earth but people will still see it as living just like we consider this living right now. Situationists don't like the limited experiences a consumerist society offers; no problem, with less than 1 billion people on earth and a challenging fresh environment to understand, staying alive will be a learning experience by itself. Consumers don't need to worry either (or is it neither?) because the technological development that will sustain us through the new world will require a highly interactive network of co-operative designers, manufacturers, traders and buyers. And with a marketplace system in place there will always be someone looking to fill a niche or two. Not to mention the fact that as a species we have no intention of giving up the advancements we've come up with and move into candle-powered teepees. Best of all; with most of us gone our environmental footy print will be a lot less felt by mother gaia. And the life that ain't gonna make it to this next epoch (which includes 80-90% of today's kids) well, philosophy is a human construct and is of no concern to nature so shed your tear and move on.

nbng

I approve of environmental collapse in the James lovelock sense: 80-90% of humans dead and gone, mass life extinction, this will leave the overall survivors with a completely new world to make their own- wow! I would love to be part of that but I'll probably be dead like most of us. There will be some real jaw dropping changes to living on earth but people will still see it as living just like we consider this living right now. Situationists don't like the limited experiences a consumerist society offers; no problem, with less than 1 billion people on earth and a challenging fresh environment to understand, staying alive will be a learning experience by itself. Consumers don't need to worry either (or is it neither?) because the technological development that will sustain us through the new world will require a highly interactive network of co-operative designers, manufacturers, traders and buyers. And with a marketplace system in place there will always be someone looking to fill a niche or two. Not to mention the fact that as a species we have no intention of giving up the advancements we've come up with and move into candle-powered teepees. Best of all; with most of us gone our environmental footy print will be a lot less felt by mother gaia. And the life that ain't gonna make it to this next epoch (which includes 80-90% of today's kids) well, philosophy is a human construct and is of no concern to nature so shed your tear and move on.

Anonymous

Perhaps we are only going through what Europe has experienced for centuries. Our(American)culture has fed the world for 100 years and now its over. The party's over. The innocents are dead. This remorse and walloing in self pity can only last so long before a new culture of discovery emerges..trouble is, nobody can imagine such a thing.

Anonymous

Perhaps we are only going through what Europe has experienced for centuries. Our(American)culture has fed the world for 100 years and now its over. The party's over. The innocents are dead. This remorse and walloing in self pity can only last so long before a new culture of discovery emerges..trouble is, nobody can imagine such a thing.

Anonymous

Oh, come on, Adbusters.

I love you, but you're starting to remind me of Glenn Beck's "War Room" from back in early '09 with all your apocalyptic gloominess.

Put a smile on my face, for once. Pretty please?

Anonymous

Oh, come on, Adbusters.

I love you, but you're starting to remind me of Glenn Beck's "War Room" from back in early '09 with all your apocalyptic gloominess.

Put a smile on my face, for once. Pretty please?

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