The Post-Postmodernism Issue

Rupture or Rapture?

This millennium-long human adventure of ours may now be reaching a climax.
Rupture or Rapture?

From Greek democracy to Christian love to modernity’s promise of utopia – the human story has been a series of grand narratives, each consuming and evolving beyond the one that came before. Reason eclipsed faith, freedom eclipsed tyranny and industry eclipsed the agrarian way of life.

Transition was not always easy, but even when we stumbled and regressed – enduring bubonic plagues, barbarian invasions and interminable periods of darkness – there was always the unspoken assumption that, through it all, we will persist … that despite all the moral, spiritual and ideological blows, the human story goes on.

But then the world was ablaze in one brutal war after another. We bore witness to the Holocaust, Hiroshima and Nagasaki – a seemingly endless nightmare of genocide, sorrow and sin. We suffered losses of existential capital like never before, and our faith in the inherent goodness of man began to waver. And just as our spiritual house was beginning to crumble, violent fissures tore across our physical world. Ocean levels rose, glaciers melted and the arctic biomass began to release trillions of tons of frozen methane stored over the course of aeons. It suddenly dawned on us that this millennium-long human adventure of ours may be reaching a climax, that over the next few years, we may be living through what could well be humanity’s final rapture moment: peak oil, peak water, peak food, peak everything … even peak sanity and peak TIME!

Not even Nietzsche could have foretold the mystical amalgamation of melancholy, terror and life-affirming ecstasy weaving its way through the last chapters of man.

For the Wild, Kalle

72 comments on the article “Rupture or Rapture?”

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KenVallario

i liked this little meditation...and the ambiguity seems conscious...this is not a work of philosophy, it is a sensual exploration of what is happening, and this is good, it is good for us to support this kind of expression, if only because it is not robotic and coldly analytical...it IS emotional.

many people have an agenda, be it Iran or corporate corruption or democracy, etc...but the new integrated natural order is calling us to rediscover our primitive shamanistic capabilities, and this short poetic meditation points in that direction.

the world's population has doubled in the last 30 years. in my mind, this has had an often overlooked dramatic existential effect, a numerical reality that cannot be completely understood, but due to our social natures, the simultaneity of this change with the escalation of connection has made us intensely neurotic as a species, and it will take time to develop a new set of coping skills.

although social justice is an important life calling, many of us must accept that it is a calling, and many are called to more poetic responses to life's challenges, less material ways of providing comfort to one another, and that if there is a long term solution for these profound forces confronting us, it will most likely be a result of deeply mystical forms of leadership.

i like adbusters articles most when they lack an agenda, when they are deeply engaged, vulnerable and open to any possibility, and this one fits that description...

KenVallario

i liked this little meditation...and the ambiguity seems conscious...this is not a work of philosophy, it is a sensual exploration of what is happening, and this is good, it is good for us to support this kind of expression, if only because it is not robotic and coldly analytical...it IS emotional.

many people have an agenda, be it Iran or corporate corruption or democracy, etc...but the new integrated natural order is calling us to rediscover our primitive shamanistic capabilities, and this short poetic meditation points in that direction.

the world's population has doubled in the last 30 years. in my mind, this has had an often overlooked dramatic existential effect, a numerical reality that cannot be completely understood, but due to our social natures, the simultaneity of this change with the escalation of connection has made us intensely neurotic as a species, and it will take time to develop a new set of coping skills.

although social justice is an important life calling, many of us must accept that it is a calling, and many are called to more poetic responses to life's challenges, less material ways of providing comfort to one another, and that if there is a long term solution for these profound forces confronting us, it will most likely be a result of deeply mystical forms of leadership.

i like adbusters articles most when they lack an agenda, when they are deeply engaged, vulnerable and open to any possibility, and this one fits that description...

Rebops

Sound and fury signifying nothing.

I haven't been on the Adbusters' site for awhile, but to come across this kind of commentary is disheartening. Not a critique, not a call to action, but rather the trumpeting reassurance that we're in some great epic film.

"It suddenly dawned on us"........

This is some shallow shit, my friends.

Rebops

Sound and fury signifying nothing.

I haven't been on the Adbusters' site for awhile, but to come across this kind of commentary is disheartening. Not a critique, not a call to action, but rather the trumpeting reassurance that we're in some great epic film.

"It suddenly dawned on us"........

This is some shallow shit, my friends.

KenVallario

when you can clarify that set of actions that produce something that most people can agree to call progress, i'm sure you will attract the stored potential energy that most of us have in the form of hope, but a critique without alternatives, in an age such as ours, is simply adding to the antagonism of an already stressed social environment.

KenVallario

when you can clarify that set of actions that produce something that most people can agree to call progress, i'm sure you will attract the stored potential energy that most of us have in the form of hope, but a critique without alternatives, in an age such as ours, is simply adding to the antagonism of an already stressed social environment.

K.A.T.

Right On! Bravo! I mean I concur... As blameworthy as many global, social, and economic situations are, placing blame is so very unproductive. It is what it is. I for one, refuse to live whatever life I have left assessing our failures as a people, faulting everyone for everything under the sun, and complaining as if I have greater due than what I create for myself and my family. As dim as life may seem at times, we still have purpose and destiny that can make it exciting and fun and a truly wonderful experience. If we could put energy into finding it for ourselves, we might also find that progress you speak of...

K.A.T.

Right On! Bravo! I mean I concur... As blameworthy as many global, social, and economic situations are, placing blame is so very unproductive. It is what it is. I for one, refuse to live whatever life I have left assessing our failures as a people, faulting everyone for everything under the sun, and complaining as if I have greater due than what I create for myself and my family. As dim as life may seem at times, we still have purpose and destiny that can make it exciting and fun and a truly wonderful experience. If we could put energy into finding it for ourselves, we might also find that progress you speak of...

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