The Post-Postmodernism Issue

Rupture or Rapture?

This millennium-long human adventure of ours may now be reaching a climax.
Rupture or Rapture?

From Greek democracy to Christian love to modernity’s promise of utopia – the human story has been a series of grand narratives, each consuming and evolving beyond the one that came before. Reason eclipsed faith, freedom eclipsed tyranny and industry eclipsed the agrarian way of life.

Transition was not always easy, but even when we stumbled and regressed – enduring bubonic plagues, barbarian invasions and interminable periods of darkness – there was always the unspoken assumption that, through it all, we will persist … that despite all the moral, spiritual and ideological blows, the human story goes on.

But then the world was ablaze in one brutal war after another. We bore witness to the Holocaust, Hiroshima and Nagasaki – a seemingly endless nightmare of genocide, sorrow and sin. We suffered losses of existential capital like never before, and our faith in the inherent goodness of man began to waver. And just as our spiritual house was beginning to crumble, violent fissures tore across our physical world. Ocean levels rose, glaciers melted and the arctic biomass began to release trillions of tons of frozen methane stored over the course of aeons. It suddenly dawned on us that this millennium-long human adventure of ours may be reaching a climax, that over the next few years, we may be living through what could well be humanity’s final rapture moment: peak oil, peak water, peak food, peak everything … even peak sanity and peak TIME!

Not even Nietzsche could have foretold the mystical amalgamation of melancholy, terror and life-affirming ecstasy weaving its way through the last chapters of man.

For the Wild, Kalle

72 comments on the article “Rupture or Rapture?”

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grayson

I've been wondering lately about the ironic nature of discussing anarchy, etc. in a medium like print-magazine that we pay for. The thing is, the world isn't black and white. If one wanted to start a socialist revolution, and used paper board and markers that were purchased within the capitalist system, the irony ends at laughter and serves no useful political critique. How else would one get paper and ink to create pamphlets? Not to mention the possibility of stealing said goods.

Now, the Internet is not as capital-driven as you so arrogantly expressed; it's roots are as much in cooperation between public and private educational and scientific bodies as it is industrial bodies. Also, as another poster commented, the Internet is ontologically anarchistic--an open, free space for information to be exchanged in a "points-to-points" system (keep in mind television, radio, etc. are point-to-points). Like the above commenter also stated, it's the intrusion of government and corporations that take away from the potentially complete liberty of the Internet--IP tracking to punish file sharers, for example. And just to preemptively dispel any attempts to argue that the computer programs themselves are necessarily produced with capital, read up on Open Source!
It was definitely promoting revolution in the streets, which I think they deserve credit for and more nudges in that direction.

grayson

I've been wondering lately about the ironic nature of discussing anarchy, etc. in a medium like print-magazine that we pay for. The thing is, the world isn't black and white. If one wanted to start a socialist revolution, and used paper board and markers that were purchased within the capitalist system, the irony ends at laughter and serves no useful political critique. How else would one get paper and ink to create pamphlets? Not to mention the possibility of stealing said goods.

Now, the Internet is not as capital-driven as you so arrogantly expressed; it's roots are as much in cooperation between public and private educational and scientific bodies as it is industrial bodies. Also, as another poster commented, the Internet is ontologically anarchistic--an open, free space for information to be exchanged in a "points-to-points" system (keep in mind television, radio, etc. are point-to-points). Like the above commenter also stated, it's the intrusion of government and corporations that take away from the potentially complete liberty of the Internet--IP tracking to punish file sharers, for example. And just to preemptively dispel any attempts to argue that the computer programs themselves are necessarily produced with capital, read up on Open Source!
It was definitely promoting revolution in the streets, which I think they deserve credit for and more nudges in that direction.

Gorbud

Most advocates of anarchy don't think that far ahead. Your right the worst among us will not only survive but rule. We went through this during the "dark ages" after Rome and Greece fell. Not a fun time I am lead to believe. These expressions are the rantings of emotion over the thinking preocess. Some believe; "I think, there for it is so." Writing about some abstraction does not make it true. The mob is without pity or thought, it is a force of nature and sweeps all before it whether philosopher, poet, murderer, or madman. Romantic visions of anarchy are just that.

Gorbud

Most advocates of anarchy don't think that far ahead. Your right the worst among us will not only survive but rule. We went through this during the "dark ages" after Rome and Greece fell. Not a fun time I am lead to believe. These expressions are the rantings of emotion over the thinking preocess. Some believe; "I think, there for it is so." Writing about some abstraction does not make it true. The mob is without pity or thought, it is a force of nature and sweeps all before it whether philosopher, poet, murderer, or madman. Romantic visions of anarchy are just that.

Anonymous

I'm afraid you make the mistake of focusing on the present; in the not so distant future, living off the grid is likely to become a very tempting proposition indeed!

We can participate within the "free" system you describe, sure. But the idea that we can reform it through democratic participation is the biggest illusion there ever was.

If we are to talk about the present, I believe the best we can do is to awaken people to the systematic lies that are being told. Once you realise the full extent of the manipulation we are submitted to, the only logical action to take is to break away.

As for you finding the use of the internet by anarchists absurd, you'll find that the internet is inherently anarchistic and non-commercial by origin! It's only now, at this very moment, that the very forces that don't want to see true democratic participation (government and big corporations) are trying to reform the internet to align it with their interests by assuming control over everything communicated and stored. But for now it is still a relatively open, free platform founded on altruistic motives. I truly hope it will stay that way, although it's not looking good.

Anonymous

I'm afraid you make the mistake of focusing on the present; in the not so distant future, living off the grid is likely to become a very tempting proposition indeed!

We can participate within the "free" system you describe, sure. But the idea that we can reform it through democratic participation is the biggest illusion there ever was.

If we are to talk about the present, I believe the best we can do is to awaken people to the systematic lies that are being told. Once you realise the full extent of the manipulation we are submitted to, the only logical action to take is to break away.

As for you finding the use of the internet by anarchists absurd, you'll find that the internet is inherently anarchistic and non-commercial by origin! It's only now, at this very moment, that the very forces that don't want to see true democratic participation (government and big corporations) are trying to reform the internet to align it with their interests by assuming control over everything communicated and stored. But for now it is still a relatively open, free platform founded on altruistic motives. I truly hope it will stay that way, although it's not looking good.

cruxcatalyst

Peak Sanity - I like it. Have we passed it, or are we yet to get there, I wonder?

Here's another 'Peak' - but written about in a more lighthearted way in the hopes of engaging people who are not yet on this frequency:

http://postgrowth.org/peak-sleep

I think its prudent to be well aware of the painful future that may await even those of us who are comfortably blogging away and not dodging bullets, but in our communication to those we want to engage with, what are we offering them that is better than what they have now?

How can we make this transition compelling and interesting and desirable, somewhere people want to go?

cruxcatalyst

Peak Sanity - I like it. Have we passed it, or are we yet to get there, I wonder?

Here's another 'Peak' - but written about in a more lighthearted way in the hopes of engaging people who are not yet on this frequency:

http://postgrowth.org/peak-sleep

I think its prudent to be well aware of the painful future that may await even those of us who are comfortably blogging away and not dodging bullets, but in our communication to those we want to engage with, what are we offering them that is better than what they have now?

How can we make this transition compelling and interesting and desirable, somewhere people want to go?

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