Percentage of American households ...

Are you happy yet?

We were high on the thrill of early capitalism. We loved the cars, the airplanes, the endless aisles of mega marts teeming with mass-produced goodies. We loved the validation that each new purchase brought. And then came the technology: the flat screens, MacBooks, iPhones and Xboxes. Every technological breakthrough made us feel more connected, more human and more whole. But then the economy collapsed and we began to tumble … suddenly we weren’t so sure anymore. The line between necessity and luxury – once blurred beyond distinction – came into sudden, violent focus. What pleasure is there in a 50-inch plasma if you don’t have a wall to hang it on? What joy does a brand new automobile bring if climate change looms large on the horizon? The wisdom of credit, and the attendant practice of living well beyond our means, suddenly hit home. And now, as belts tighten and paradigms crumble, we are beginning to hear the first whispers of a post-consumer era … the dawning of a post-materialist age.

34 comments on the article “Are You Happy Yet?”

Displaying 21 - 30 of 34

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AnonymousCanadian

Yeah I think its written either by high school students or some retired postal service worker.

E for effort....

John

"Second, look at the practical aspects of conspicuous consumption: There are some practical advantages to displaying nice finery, such as more attention and higher status among peers."

this insane paragraph is from an online article from Psychology today:

http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/200807/shop-til-you-drop

ME,WHO-ELSE?

Go back to the 40's!! 40's (america) provided most of everything we needed and not too much else. We had groceries, heated apartments, hot and cold running water, indoor facilities, communication, transportation, education, entertainment, and most of all....common sense! If we were to raise the rest of the world to the living standards of the 40's and reduce ours, methinks there would be plenty to go around. What's really funny is, we may not get a choice.

ball hugger

um nope, retard, we can't becuase our present infrastructure can't pump out enough corn to feed the world like america... because of marginal utility, each successive unit of additional production requires a greater input of resource the more and more and we need, add on top of that the fact the finitude of resources. wow! retard! if dumb was a resource, we'd really be flying high as a global economic infrastructure huh!

nope, all we have to look forward too is more and more strife until we fully develop biochemistry and other crazy physics to fix shit.

in the mean time, its war war war war war war war war war war war... hahaha

Anonymous

That is not how marginal utility works. Marginal utility illustrates the inherent usefulness of every additional unit of output. It only begins diminishing after the point of optimization. If you are right and we don't have the infrastructure to feed America we would never then see a declining marginal utility because we would benefit by every bit of corn processed and there would be no excess.

Your post lacks logic and an understanding of the English language. But hey maybe we can wait for biochemistry and crazy physics to fix your shit :)

Anonymous

yeah you're right, but haven't we gotten to a point of optimization already? i guess my whole post was merely to get angry at the person before me, without understanding his point of view (something you're already pretty good at)

but as far as we can be concerned, rather than poke holes in my argument to assuage your own feelings of eschatological guilt, is what i'm saying pretty close to the truth?

think on it, motherfucker.

Anonymous

I think with the collapse of the environment.The standard of living in capitalism and communism is getting worse.My parents lived way better than me no question.and there parents lived a more normal life perhaps then them.But it seems like nowadays everything is plastic and disposable.

Anonymous

Perhaps, but things are changing extra wide baby gate. There were rivers I grew up around, that were too polluted to even think about keeping things alive, and today there are fish thriving in there once again.

Beth

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