Nihilism and Revolution

Thinking the Unthinkable

At what point does economic growth become uneconomic growth?
Thinking the Unthinkable
Dan Golden Inc. – Crazy New Shit

This article is available in:

Every society clings to a myth by which it lives. Ours is the myth of economic growth. For the last five decades the pursuit of growth has been the single most important policy goal across the world. The global economy is almost five times the size it was half a century ago. If it continues to grow at the same rate, the economy will be 80 times that size by the year 2100.

This extraordinary ramping up of global economic activity has no historical precedent. It’s totally at odds with our scientific knowledge of the finite resource base and the fragile ecology we depend on for survival. And it has already been accompanied by the degradation of an estimated 60% of the world’s ecosystems.

For the most part, we avoid the stark reality of these numbers. The default assumption is that – financial crises aside – growth will continue indefinitely. Not just for the poorest countries where a better quality of life is undeniably needed, but even for the richest nations where the cornucopia of material wealth adds little to happiness and is beginning to threaten the foundations of our well-being.

The reasons for this collective blindness are easy enough to find. The modern economy is structurally reliant on economic growth for its stability. When growth falters – as it has done recently – politicians panic. Businesses struggle to survive. People lose their jobs and sometimes their homes. A spiral of recession looms. Questioning growth is deemed to be the act of lunatics, idealists and revolutionaries.

But question it we must. The myth of growth has failed us. It has failed the two billion people who still live on less than $2 a day. It has failed the fragile ecological systems we depend on for survival. It has failed spectacularly, in its own terms, to provide economic stability and secure people’s livelihoods.

Today we find ourselves faced with the imminent end of the era of cheap oil; the prospect (beyond the recent bubble) of steadily rising commodity prices; the degradation of forests, lakes and soils; conflicts over land use, water quality and fishing rights; and the momentous challenge of stabilizing concentrations of carbon in the global atmosphere. And we face these tasks with an economy that is fundamentally broken, in desperate need of renewal.

In these circumstances, a return to business as usual is not an option. Prosperity for the few founded on ecological destruction and persistent social injustice is no foundation for a civilized society. Economic recovery is vital. Protecting people’s jobs – and creating new ones – is absolutely essential. But we also stand in urgent need of a renewed sense of shared prosperity. A commitment to fairness and flourishing in a finite world.

Delivering these goals may seem an unfamiliar or even incongruous task for policy in the modern age. The role of government has been framed so narrowly by material aims and hollowed out by a misguided vision of unbounded consumer freedoms. The concept of governance itself stands in urgent need of renewal.

But the current economic crisis presents us with a unique opportunity to invest in change. To sweep away the short-term thinking that has plagued society for decades. To replace it with policy capable of addressing the enormous challenge of delivering a lasting prosperity.

For at the end of the day, prosperity goes beyond material pleasures. It transcends material concerns. It resides in the quality of our lives and in the health and happiness of our families. It is present in the strength of our relationships and our trust in the community. It is evidenced by our satisfaction at work and our sense of shared meaning and purpose. It hangs on our potential to participate fully in the life of society.

Prosperity consists in our ability to flourish as human beings – within the ecological limits of a finite planet. The challenge for our society is to create the conditions under which this is possible. It is the most urgent task of our times.

Tim Jackson, from “Prosperity without Growth,” sd-commission.org.uk.

40 comments on the article “Thinking the Unthinkable”

Displaying 21 - 30 of 40

Page 3 of 4

Anonymous

We need to curb population growth period. Unrestrained growth is at the core of every major problem this planet faces. There are simply too many of us to support without critically draining every resource we have.

Anonymous

We need to curb population growth period. Unrestrained growth is at the core of every major problem this planet faces. There are simply too many of us to support without critically draining every resource we have.

Anonymous

Economic growth is NOT achieved by the creation of money out of thin air. It is achieved by the exploitation of physical resources---that is, natural resources. There is nothing to consume if there are no physical resources out of which to manufacture things! Our economy must be understood in biophysical, rather than merely financial, terms.

Anonymous

Economic growth is NOT achieved by the creation of money out of thin air. It is achieved by the exploitation of physical resources---that is, natural resources. There is nothing to consume if there are no physical resources out of which to manufacture things! Our economy must be understood in biophysical, rather than merely financial, terms.

Anonymous

well written, but it all still sounds strikingly familiar. generalities are a writers best friend, and make for a light read. But they dont serve to educate the reader. What we all need are more specifics, more detail, and more science.

Anonymous

well written, but it all still sounds strikingly familiar. generalities are a writers best friend, and make for a light read. But they dont serve to educate the reader. What we all need are more specifics, more detail, and more science.

Anonymous

no, please no more science!!! it's what got us in this shithole in the first place, and it continues to keep us from doing what needs to be done. 'more studies needed' 'more research needed'. it's right in front of us, YOU are science! but we've forgotten how or what to look at, or simply don't recognize IT. be the scientist, and the humanitarian and the doer. stop waiting for "them" to give you the green light to act!

Anonymous

no, please no more science!!! it's what got us in this shithole in the first place, and it continues to keep us from doing what needs to be done. 'more studies needed' 'more research needed'. it's right in front of us, YOU are science! but we've forgotten how or what to look at, or simply don't recognize IT. be the scientist, and the humanitarian and the doer. stop waiting for "them" to give you the green light to act!

Pages

Add a new comment

Comments are closed.