Media Democracy

Hollow Land

Israel’s Architecture of Occupation.

A new way of imagining space has emerged. After fragmenting the surface of the West Bank by walls and other barriers, Israeli planners started attempting to weave it together as two separate but overlapping national geographies – two territorial networks overlapping across the same area in three dimensions, without having to cross or come together.

One is an upper-land – the land of the settlements – a scattering of well-tended hilltop neighborhoods woven together by modern highways for the exclusive use of its inhabitants; the other, Palestine – crowded cities, towns and villages that inhabit the valleys between and underneath the hills, maintaining fragile connections on improvised underpasses. Within this new political space, separate security corridors, infrastructure, bridges and underground tunnels have been woven into a bewildering and impossible Escher-like territorial arrangement that struggles to multiply a single territorial reality.

Eyal Weizman
Hollow Land

Lords of the Land: The War for Israel’s Settlements in the Occupied Territories, 1967-2007 by Idith Zertal and Akiva Eldar
Hollow Land: Israel’s Acrchitecture of Occupation by Eval Weizman
Hold Everything Dear: Dispatches on Survival and Resistance by John Berger

After 60 years of hostility, three new books offer a new light and direction for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: Lords of the Land: The War for Israel’s Settlements in the Occupied Territories, 1967-2007 by Idith Zertal and Akiva Eldar, Hollow Land: Israel’s Acrchitecture of Occupation by Eval Weizman and Hold Everything Dear: Dispatches on Survival and Resistance by John Berger. Excerpts from these books are highlighted in the following slideshow below:

Photo Credits: (Slide 1 and 2) HAZEM BADER/AFP/Getty Images, (Slide 3) GALI TIBBON/AFP/Getty Images, (Slide 4) Steeve Iunker (iuncker.ch), and (Slide 6) Newscom.

16 comments on the article “Hollow Land”

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Talha

It's year 2008, there's plenty of money in the world, there's technology, science, knowledge, thousands of years of experience, humans are still the most important creatures of the universe. But there's some among us who insists on degrading the humanity and supporting injustice that's unique to us. But there's an undeniable justice out of everything, I believe there will be a pay back but hopefully not in this world.

Talha

It's year 2008, there's plenty of money in the world, there's technology, science, knowledge, thousands of years of experience, humans are still the most important creatures of the universe. But there's some among us who insists on degrading the humanity and supporting injustice that's unique to us. But there's an undeniable justice out of everything, I believe there will be a pay back but hopefully not in this world.

Javier

I'd like to say that I find the text of the speech-bubble by which some (Western) author has decided to represent the Palestinian man in the sixth photo to be rather problematic and, in fact, offensive.

I imagine that that man, after being allowed the chance (previously negated by Israel) to buy necessities for himself/his family/etc., in Egypt, had to return to Gaza, a location that many (yes, even 'reputable') observers have called an open-air prison. It seems highly presumptuous, then, to suggest that this Palestinian man, temporarily liberated from the brutal conditions of Gaza, would be able to experience any meaningful sense of freedom.

Javier

I'd like to say that I find the text of the speech-bubble by which some (Western) author has decided to represent the Palestinian man in the sixth photo to be rather problematic and, in fact, offensive.

I imagine that that man, after being allowed the chance (previously negated by Israel) to buy necessities for himself/his family/etc., in Egypt, had to return to Gaza, a location that many (yes, even 'reputable') observers have called an open-air prison. It seems highly presumptuous, then, to suggest that this Palestinian man, temporarily liberated from the brutal conditions of Gaza, would be able to experience any meaningful sense of freedom.

mary

I believe you. That was not appropriate. I wonder if the person who did that , has hopes for that being the case, one day.

Man is capable of horrific atrociaties, and also immense good. Why would we settle for the first, rather than the latter? What good comes from making people prisoners, and treating them less than human?
Why?

mary

I believe you. That was not appropriate. I wonder if the person who did that , has hopes for that being the case, one day.

Man is capable of horrific atrociaties, and also immense good. Why would we settle for the first, rather than the latter? What good comes from making people prisoners, and treating them less than human?
Why?

Anonymous

The Berlin Wall comes down and the Israeli Wall goes up. So much for "culture". The US did not permanently occupy parts of Germany or Poland after WWII, thereby setting a good example. Israel is to the Palestinians as the US govt. and its citizens were to the Native Americans. Fanatical Zionists must go. The settlements are an absurd, morally repellant monstrosity. Expect the Palestinians to continue to lob rockets.

Anonymous

The Berlin Wall comes down and the Israeli Wall goes up. So much for "culture". The US did not permanently occupy parts of Germany or Poland after WWII, thereby setting a good example. Israel is to the Palestinians as the US govt. and its citizens were to the Native Americans. Fanatical Zionists must go. The settlements are an absurd, morally repellant monstrosity. Expect the Palestinians to continue to lob rockets.

Anonymous

"queued for moderation" Oh, I get it. Moderation. Yeah, right. Following the example of West Bank settlers I suppose.

Anonymous

"queued for moderation" Oh, I get it. Moderation. Yeah, right. Following the example of West Bank settlers I suppose.

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