The Perennial Philosophy

Why do modern departments of philosophy have no place for the mystical?

Csilla Klenyánszki

Buddha mapped enlightenment as the nautical ley lines to inner peace. Jesus walked on waves of self-sacrifice and plotted love as a way to helm the soul to salvation. Nietzsche rode against currents of religious piety—and in the face of that behemoth, sailed the breakers of nihilism to eternal joy.

King sailed through channels of racial inequality and anchored western culture to paths of desegregation.

Malcom challenged legions of racist warships and conquered waters of racial identity and power.

Sartre showed us clouds of self-creation and tactical action as the guide to horizons of happiness.

Gödel built compasses of mathematical rebellion to defy currents and streams, enabling circumnavigation through new straits.

Wittgenstein stripped ships of their excess cargo of intangible and irrelevant philosophy in pursuit of truth.

And Jung, by covering the entire ocean of the spirit, drew our first maps of the person.

It is in studying carefully these great maps and utilizing their initiatives that we can invent new means and passages to distant frontiers.