Adbusters

Damn the Fashionistas!

How do we lessen advertising's grip on culture?

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It would be all too easy to fly into an indignant, leftist rage at the sight of a wan model dressed in luxury shopping bags and splayed out next to garbage cans. But that’s probably the exact reaction W magazine was banking on with its “homeless chic” pictorial. Fashion advertising is increasingly driven by the dialectic between salacious imagery and moral outrage. Something so absurd as the W spread, in which destitution has never looked so glamorous, seems more like a culture jam – an effort to subvert the advertising – than advertising itself. But advertising, like a virus, is always evolving. It has appropriated absurdity in an attempt to render itself immune to subversion. And now people who see the magazine will break into two camps – those who think its reprehensible and those who think its fabulous. Those two sides will argue, keeping W exactly where it wants to be - in the spotlight. So anyone truly concerned with lessening advertising’s grip on culture will have to figure out not how to subvert this kind of ad, but how to jam the dialectic it feeds on. How do we do that? How can we jam the ad industry and the fashionistas?

Sarah Nardi

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108 comments on the article “Damn the Fashionistas!”

Displaying 41 - 50 of 108

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beverboy899

Whatever should be done to lessen our cultures addiction to advertising, this is not helping. These pictures; pictures that portray expensive clothing in broken society are only convincing advertising's fragile audience of proles that style is attained at the cash register. To cure the brainwashed epidemic we (we being someone capable, genuine, and useful; so not myself) have to convince the dumbfounded masses that style and appeal flow from originality not bank accounts.

beverboy899

Whatever should be done to lessen our cultures addiction to advertising, this is not helping. These pictures; pictures that portray expensive clothing in broken society are only convincing advertising's fragile audience of proles that style is attained at the cash register. To cure the brainwashed epidemic we (we being someone capable, genuine, and useful; so not myself) have to convince the dumbfounded masses that style and appeal flow from originality not bank accounts.

Lloyd Pitcher

YOU ALL MISS THE POINT! There is nothing wrong with fashion or paying a lot of money for clothes you want and like. These designers should be applauded and not looked down on! Should we all run around like Chairman Mao or don our Star-trek spacesuits?

Is Jean Paul Gauthier and Prada the problem or is the mass production of Wal-Mart and K-Mart clothes the problem? The former uses artisans in Italy to make their clothes and get fine fabrics that are oftentimes hand-made. They are innovators. The later employs cheap Chinese labor in sweat-shops, use cheap polyester and plastics and recycle (or steal) the designers' patterns. The high-end designers have to make real quality stuff that ensures their customers' happiness. The Wal-Mart sweatshop produces crap that nobody REALLY wants and doesn't care about the happiness of the consumers who pick up their clothes in mass quantities for 9.95 ea.

Think about it! Turning all of us into low-priced consumers wearing nondescript Wal-Mart crap is not the answer. We should instead opt for less...but of better quality.

Lloyd Pitcher

YOU ALL MISS THE POINT! There is nothing wrong with fashion or paying a lot of money for clothes you want and like. These designers should be applauded and not looked down on! Should we all run around like Chairman Mao or don our Star-trek spacesuits?

Is Jean Paul Gauthier and Prada the problem or is the mass production of Wal-Mart and K-Mart clothes the problem? The former uses artisans in Italy to make their clothes and get fine fabrics that are oftentimes hand-made. They are innovators. The later employs cheap Chinese labor in sweat-shops, use cheap polyester and plastics and recycle (or steal) the designers' patterns. The high-end designers have to make real quality stuff that ensures their customers' happiness. The Wal-Mart sweatshop produces crap that nobody REALLY wants and doesn't care about the happiness of the consumers who pick up their clothes in mass quantities for 9.95 ea.

Think about it! Turning all of us into low-priced consumers wearing nondescript Wal-Mart crap is not the answer. We should instead opt for less...but of better quality.

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