Adbusters

What is the Carnivalesque Rebellion?

A sudden unexpected moment of truth, a mass reversal of perspective, a global mindshift ...

The Carnivalesque Rebellion is about to begin. From November 22nd to the 28th, culture jammers of all kinds – from artists to churchgoers, anarchists to carpenters – will disregard the illegitimate laws of consumer society. For seven nights, they will honor instead the dictates of their hearts and the demands of their conscience. Overwhelmed by a myriad of insurrections and unexpected acts of resistance, consumer capitalism will grind to a halt.

With little time remaining before these events, what is needed now is not a treatise on the injustice of consumerism. It is true that 36 million humans starve to death each year, that there is an island of plastic the size of Texas floating in the ocean, and that one in four Americans have a mental illness. But these facts roll across our consciousness; they do not impel us to remake society. Whether we have become desensitized to the severity of our plight or our minds simply cannot fathom the direness of our situation, the fact remains that today what we need is the opposite of information.

The success of our insurrection will not depend on quantity of the crowd nor extent of the media coverage. In some cities the rebellion may be invisible and in others its impact downplayed. None of that matters. The Carnivalesque Rebellion will be victorious when we stop waiting for the majority, the mainstream, or the consumer class to give us permission to rebel. The revolution against consumerism will come when we trust our intuition and find within ourselves the permission to act.

The Carnivalesque Rebellion is, above all else, a chance to rise above cynicism, skepticism, and ironic detachment. It is an invitation to don the prankster's mask, to regain the sense of magical possibility, and to finally start living.

Meet up with fellow activists and download posters and campaign materials at www.adbusters.org/bnd.

Adbusters 111 Cover

On Newsstands December 3

At last we’re in Winter. It’s the year 2047. A worn scrapbook from the future arrives in your lap. It offers a stunning global vision, a warning to the next generations, a repository of practical wisdom, and an invaluable roadmap which you need to navigate the dark times, and the opportunities, which lie ahead.

Subscribe to Adbusters Magazine

80 comments on the article “What is the Carnivalesque Rebellion?”

Displaying 41 - 50 of 80

Page 5 of 8

Anonymous

guess what idiot, being a human doesn't mean shit. we're just animals. get over yourself. capitalism is just a male idea in a male dominated society that was created by, yep you guessed it, males and obviously as we can all see by just opening our eyes... IT ISN'T WORKING you conceited prick.

Anonymous

guess what idiot, being a human doesn't mean shit. we're just animals. get over yourself. capitalism is just a male idea in a male dominated society that was created by, yep you guessed it, males and obviously as we can all see by just opening our eyes... IT ISN'T WORKING you conceited prick.

Anonymous

our economy is based on a system which defines success by growth. You have to grow every year, you have to make more, sell more, buy more. i think it's pretty much standard common sense that this wont work. its only depleting our earth thanks to people like you.

Anonymous

our economy is based on a system which defines success by growth. You have to grow every year, you have to make more, sell more, buy more. i think it's pretty much standard common sense that this wont work. its only depleting our earth thanks to people like you.

Anonymous

This seems like a good way to get people started.

It reminds me of the Southpark episode where all the senior citizens get all rowed up and then forget what it was they were angry about as they keep discussing.

Challenging the system should be the norm not the exception. If we do not challenge the orders that be how do you expect things to change.

Sure it is much easier to lean back and bitch about how it should be done but come talk to me when I see you on the street rather than hiding behind your computer screen.

I like bartering with people because it goes back to where real value is. You might have dollars in your pocket but how good will that do you when I have the only glass of water in the desert.

Re-think your personal value system and you will find that you can have a much simpler life without giving everything up.

Anonymous

This seems like a good way to get people started.

It reminds me of the Southpark episode where all the senior citizens get all rowed up and then forget what it was they were angry about as they keep discussing.

Challenging the system should be the norm not the exception. If we do not challenge the orders that be how do you expect things to change.

Sure it is much easier to lean back and bitch about how it should be done but come talk to me when I see you on the street rather than hiding behind your computer screen.

I like bartering with people because it goes back to where real value is. You might have dollars in your pocket but how good will that do you when I have the only glass of water in the desert.

Re-think your personal value system and you will find that you can have a much simpler life without giving everything up.

Anonymous

"It's a carnivalesque rebellion."
"What's that? some kind of art fag circus?"
"no... I'm going to pick up one of those giant inflatable snow globes they sell at Wal-Mart for the Christmas pukes, set it up in the parking lot, and sit inside of it dressed up like Jesus. It's like an anti-consumer spectacle." I felt ridiculous as i said it out loud. The tone of my voice lacked conviction.
"That sounds ridiculous," he answered dryly.
"yeah," I admitted, feeling kind of silly. He stared at me blankly, like I had told him I was hopping on a moon ferry to collect cheese.
"Well, what are you doing next week?"
"I dunno. I was thinking about burning down my house and moving to New Zealand."
"I can't fuckin' talk to you," he snapped back."liked you so much better before you started obsessing about all this shit." his eyes were narrow and piercing. Then he shrugged. "Look, we're going to Gronk's on Saturday, everyone's going to be there, and you should come over whenever you decide to take a break from living in fantasy land."
We parted, and I drove off brooding. Fuck him. He was the one living in a fairy tale. I was going to fight with or without my friends, even if it made no difference. There was no going back for me. I couldn't unthink the way I thought. I was going to act, even if it was silly. I was going to live like a fool, just because I simply couldn't think of any other way.

Anonymous

"It's a carnivalesque rebellion."
"What's that? some kind of art fag circus?"
"no... I'm going to pick up one of those giant inflatable snow globes they sell at Wal-Mart for the Christmas pukes, set it up in the parking lot, and sit inside of it dressed up like Jesus. It's like an anti-consumer spectacle." I felt ridiculous as i said it out loud. The tone of my voice lacked conviction.
"That sounds ridiculous," he answered dryly.
"yeah," I admitted, feeling kind of silly. He stared at me blankly, like I had told him I was hopping on a moon ferry to collect cheese.
"Well, what are you doing next week?"
"I dunno. I was thinking about burning down my house and moving to New Zealand."
"I can't fuckin' talk to you," he snapped back."liked you so much better before you started obsessing about all this shit." his eyes were narrow and piercing. Then he shrugged. "Look, we're going to Gronk's on Saturday, everyone's going to be there, and you should come over whenever you decide to take a break from living in fantasy land."
We parted, and I drove off brooding. Fuck him. He was the one living in a fairy tale. I was going to fight with or without my friends, even if it made no difference. There was no going back for me. I couldn't unthink the way I thought. I was going to act, even if it was silly. I was going to live like a fool, just because I simply couldn't think of any other way.

Anonymous

So, on the morning after thanksgiving, I set out to break the rules of "Buy Nothing Day" to pick up a giant inflatable snow globe and what amounted to be the best Jesus costume I could assemble at a local thrift shop. It was cold and my car wouldn’t start, but I was still determined, so I jumped on a bus. The ride was packed with commuters excited to begin their holiday shopping. A couple sitting next to me chatted gingerly about plasma screen televisions and funnel cakes. An older gentleman who smelled like whiskey and cigarettes was passed out on my other side. His head slumped back and forth as the bus turned this way and that.
It took three hours to reach Wal-Mart on public transportation. I stepped inside and darted for the Christmas decorations, proud of myself for following through with my plan. I bought the biggest inflatable snow globe I could find that looked comfortable from the inside, and then proceeded to check out. It took twenty-five minutes in line to reach Cindy, working at the register. She looked exhausted, but struggled apathetically to be pleasant.
“Picking up some big decorations today?” she asked, almost asleep.
“Actually, I’m going to inflate this giant snow globe in the parking lot and sit inside of it dressed up like Jesus Christ, our Lord, Savior, and King.” I went on to explain the carnivalesque rebellion as she ran my credit card.
“So, you’re going to fight over consumption by purchasing a giant snow globe and making a spectacle of yourself?” she inquired coyly while handing me my receipt.
“I guess.”
“Huh.”
“It sounds like a better idea in my head, if that matters.”
“Well, Merry Christmas. Now, if you’ll excuse me I have to call security.”

Anonymous

So, on the morning after thanksgiving, I set out to break the rules of "Buy Nothing Day" to pick up a giant inflatable snow globe and what amounted to be the best Jesus costume I could assemble at a local thrift shop. It was cold and my car wouldn’t start, but I was still determined, so I jumped on a bus. The ride was packed with commuters excited to begin their holiday shopping. A couple sitting next to me chatted gingerly about plasma screen televisions and funnel cakes. An older gentleman who smelled like whiskey and cigarettes was passed out on my other side. His head slumped back and forth as the bus turned this way and that.
It took three hours to reach Wal-Mart on public transportation. I stepped inside and darted for the Christmas decorations, proud of myself for following through with my plan. I bought the biggest inflatable snow globe I could find that looked comfortable from the inside, and then proceeded to check out. It took twenty-five minutes in line to reach Cindy, working at the register. She looked exhausted, but struggled apathetically to be pleasant.
“Picking up some big decorations today?” she asked, almost asleep.
“Actually, I’m going to inflate this giant snow globe in the parking lot and sit inside of it dressed up like Jesus Christ, our Lord, Savior, and King.” I went on to explain the carnivalesque rebellion as she ran my credit card.
“So, you’re going to fight over consumption by purchasing a giant snow globe and making a spectacle of yourself?” she inquired coyly while handing me my receipt.
“I guess.”
“Huh.”
“It sounds like a better idea in my head, if that matters.”
“Well, Merry Christmas. Now, if you’ll excuse me I have to call security.”

Pages

Add a new comment

Comments are closed.