Adbusters

Tactical Briefing #1

The first of a series of briefings leading up to a week of Carnivalesque Rebellion

For twenty years, the culture jammer movement has been building momentum for a cultural revolution that will topple consumerism. Now Adbusters and our worldwide network of activists is calling for a Carnivalesque Rebellion this November that will shut down consumer capitalism for a week.

Can a few thousand meme warriors create a sudden, unexpected moment of truth – a global mindshift – from which the corporate/consumerist forces never fully recover? Over the next few months, we will be sending out a series of tactical briefings that chart the approaching moment of truth – #NOSTARBUCKS is our first.

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Tactical Briefing:

Activist yelling

As the hollowness of our system grows clearer, Skylar Fein’s “Keys to a Broken Nation” explores the revolutionary potential of a generation whose future has been sold.


American Psychosis

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Chris Hedges’ “American Psychosis” defines our current global crisis, conveying the necessity and inevitability of our November uprising, in a most visceral way.


Inspiration:

Ken O'Keefe

It is easier to slip into apathy than to put yourself on the line. It is human to feel afraid but courage will come with preparation and practice. Take 20 minutes and get inspired by Ken O’Keefe in this intense interview with the BBC:

Part OnePart TwoPart Three


Action:

Adbusters.org

Between November 22-28 the whole world will light up with seven days of Carnivalesque Rebellion!

Think of it as an adventure, as therapy, as Buy Nothing Day times a hundred … think of it as the World Cup of global activism – a week of postering and pranks, of talking back at your profs and speaking truth to power. Some of us will poster our schools and neighborhoods and just break our daily routines for a week. Others will chant, cut up their credit cards in big box stores and pull off theatrical stunts that provoke mass cognitive dissonance. Others still will drop stink bombs in strategic locations and engage in the most visceral kind of civil disobedience.

In all, millions of people around the world will walk out of their schools, offices and factories for a week and live!

To pull this off, we need to learn from the failures of the recent G8/G20 protests. A few sensational and spectacular acts of violence (police cars on fire, window smashing) will not provoke the kind of global mindshift that our world so desperately needs. And neither will sitting at home yelling at our screens. If our Seven Days of Carnivalesque Rebellion are to succeed we'll need a plethora of actions that cannot be dismissed as petty acts of vandalism, that genuinely challenge the power of megacorporations, that make people think about the climate tipping points now descending upon us and that highlight the perversity of a system that has brought us to the zero point of systemic collapse.

What would you do if you could mobilize thousands of connected protesters in cities all over the world? Send your best ideas for coordinated acts of civil disobedience to [email protected] and we'll share the most compelling ones in subsequent briefs.


To get the ball rolling here's a personal plunge you may want to take right away: Vow never to walk into a Starbucks ever again. Instead, search out the most interesting indie coffee shop around where you live and work … get to know the people who own and run the place and get your friends and co-workers to join you there. Individually this may feel like a drop in the bucket, but if all the 86,000 of us in this network do it collectively, then we can begin to shift power from megacorporations to our friends and neighbors.

This little shift in our lives is a good way to get in the mood … and during the week of rebellion in November, these indie coffee houses will become our meeting places and bases.

ACTION #1: #NOSTARBUCKS

A worldwide boycott of Starbucks.

In cities everywhere, we walk away from corporate java and into our local indie coffee shops instead.

Tweet #NOSTARBUCKS, Facebook it, email it, shout it from rooftops. Spread the word and send us feedback. Let's start brewing the mood for a worldwide revolution.

TARGET: 1 Million thriving indie coffee houses by November 28

Adbusters 111 Cover

On Newsstands December 3

At last we’re in Winter. It’s the year 2047. A worn scrapbook from the future arrives in your lap. It offers a stunning global vision, a warning to the next generations, a repository of practical wisdom, and an invaluable roadmap which you need to navigate the dark times, and the opportunities, which lie ahead.

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92 comments on the article “Tactical Briefing #1”

Displaying 61 - 70 of 92

Page 7 of 10

Anonymous

I don't really have the money to spend at Starbucks *or* the local coffee place. I'm excited about what the Carnivalesque Rebellion could be, but this whole coffeehouse thing seems so tangential...

...except for the fact that I inhabit the same city as Red Emma's (http://www.redemmas.org)--which is, I realize, a huge opportunity. Not everyone has one of those down the street, though. And I feel like the people at the local non-collective indie coffee place couldn't give less of a fuck about me or my anti-consumerist ideas. But I guess I should at least try to find out? How do you go about doing that, exactly? Walk in and ask the arrogant hipster baristas what they think about revolution?

Anonymous

I don't really have the money to spend at Starbucks *or* the local coffee place. I'm excited about what the Carnivalesque Rebellion could be, but this whole coffeehouse thing seems so tangential...

...except for the fact that I inhabit the same city as Red Emma's (http://www.redemmas.org)--which is, I realize, a huge opportunity. Not everyone has one of those down the street, though. And I feel like the people at the local non-collective indie coffee place couldn't give less of a fuck about me or my anti-consumerist ideas. But I guess I should at least try to find out? How do you go about doing that, exactly? Walk in and ask the arrogant hipster baristas what they think about revolution?

Anonymous

And why on Earth would you ask a hipster barista what they think about anything? They could be described as 'radical chic' (except without being rich, but they function on the same principle). That barista is wearing a Che Guevara t-shirt under that apron. Or carrying Chairman Mao's little red book in his back pocket. That barista will tell you that she is an anarchist, and will be able to tell you a little bit about anarchism. But they can't tell you anything of substance. So really, who cares what a barista, at Starbucks or that ueber-trendy coffeehouse down the street, thinks?

Like everyone else who has commented, why are we only targeting Starbucks? I mean, I hate the chain, and I can't throw a rock without hitting one---there are seven within a 2.5 mile radius of my house. But there are other corporate coffeehouses that we could avoid, too; people have mentioned Tim Horton's and Dunkin' Donuts, and I'm sure there are a dozen more that could be completely avoided.

Oh, and I looked at your Red Emma's site ... almost makes me want to move to Baltimore.

Anonymous

And why on Earth would you ask a hipster barista what they think about anything? They could be described as 'radical chic' (except without being rich, but they function on the same principle). That barista is wearing a Che Guevara t-shirt under that apron. Or carrying Chairman Mao's little red book in his back pocket. That barista will tell you that she is an anarchist, and will be able to tell you a little bit about anarchism. But they can't tell you anything of substance. So really, who cares what a barista, at Starbucks or that ueber-trendy coffeehouse down the street, thinks?

Like everyone else who has commented, why are we only targeting Starbucks? I mean, I hate the chain, and I can't throw a rock without hitting one---there are seven within a 2.5 mile radius of my house. But there are other corporate coffeehouses that we could avoid, too; people have mentioned Tim Horton's and Dunkin' Donuts, and I'm sure there are a dozen more that could be completely avoided.

Oh, and I looked at your Red Emma's site ... almost makes me want to move to Baltimore.

lois

why are we just zero-ing in on Starbucks ? why not Tim Hortons or Second Cup or the others as well ? just wondering.
cheers,
Lois

lois

why are we just zero-ing in on Starbucks ? why not Tim Hortons or Second Cup or the others as well ? just wondering.
cheers,
Lois

Anonymous

Why Starbucks? I have never seen a Starbucks ad on TV, radio or even in newpaper print. They pay their employees living wages and offer good medical insurance for employees and their dependents. Yes, their prices and gimmicks are ridiculous, but I think there are more effective ways to "revolt" than skipping a cup of joe at Starbucks.
What kind of people are in this network of 86,000? Maybe I am unusual, a mother of two living in a rural farming community. There is no Starbucks here.
In addition to our acts of civil disobedience could we not buy anything new for a week? Flood our politicians offices with calls and e-mails asking them to stop allowing advertisers to sell sugar cereals and other crap to our kids?
Carnivalesque Rebellion sounds very fun, but maybe we could also teach the world by using our free time to volunteer in community organizations or sit and talk with an elderly person at a nursing home. We need to become human again......regain our tangible human connections.

Anonymous

Why Starbucks? I have never seen a Starbucks ad on TV, radio or even in newpaper print. They pay their employees living wages and offer good medical insurance for employees and their dependents. Yes, their prices and gimmicks are ridiculous, but I think there are more effective ways to "revolt" than skipping a cup of joe at Starbucks.
What kind of people are in this network of 86,000? Maybe I am unusual, a mother of two living in a rural farming community. There is no Starbucks here.
In addition to our acts of civil disobedience could we not buy anything new for a week? Flood our politicians offices with calls and e-mails asking them to stop allowing advertisers to sell sugar cereals and other crap to our kids?
Carnivalesque Rebellion sounds very fun, but maybe we could also teach the world by using our free time to volunteer in community organizations or sit and talk with an elderly person at a nursing home. We need to become human again......regain our tangible human connections.

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