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Tactical Briefing #1

The first of a series of briefings leading up to a week of Carnivalesque Rebellion

For twenty years, the culture jammer movement has been building momentum for a cultural revolution that will topple consumerism. Now Adbusters and our worldwide network of activists is calling for a Carnivalesque Rebellion this November that will shut down consumer capitalism for a week.

Can a few thousand meme warriors create a sudden, unexpected moment of truth – a global mindshift – from which the corporate/consumerist forces never fully recover? Over the next few months, we will be sending out a series of tactical briefings that chart the approaching moment of truth – #NOSTARBUCKS is our first.

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Tactical Briefing:

Activist yelling

As the hollowness of our system grows clearer, Skylar Fein’s “Keys to a Broken Nation” explores the revolutionary potential of a generation whose future has been sold.


American Psychosis

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Chris Hedges’ “American Psychosis” defines our current global crisis, conveying the necessity and inevitability of our November uprising, in a most visceral way.


Inspiration:

Ken O'Keefe

It is easier to slip into apathy than to put yourself on the line. It is human to feel afraid but courage will come with preparation and practice. Take 20 minutes and get inspired by Ken O’Keefe in this intense interview with the BBC:

Part OnePart TwoPart Three


Action:

Adbusters.org

Between November 22-28 the whole world will light up with seven days of Carnivalesque Rebellion!

Think of it as an adventure, as therapy, as Buy Nothing Day times a hundred … think of it as the World Cup of global activism – a week of postering and pranks, of talking back at your profs and speaking truth to power. Some of us will poster our schools and neighborhoods and just break our daily routines for a week. Others will chant, cut up their credit cards in big box stores and pull off theatrical stunts that provoke mass cognitive dissonance. Others still will drop stink bombs in strategic locations and engage in the most visceral kind of civil disobedience.

In all, millions of people around the world will walk out of their schools, offices and factories for a week and live!

To pull this off, we need to learn from the failures of the recent G8/G20 protests. A few sensational and spectacular acts of violence (police cars on fire, window smashing) will not provoke the kind of global mindshift that our world so desperately needs. And neither will sitting at home yelling at our screens. If our Seven Days of Carnivalesque Rebellion are to succeed we'll need a plethora of actions that cannot be dismissed as petty acts of vandalism, that genuinely challenge the power of megacorporations, that make people think about the climate tipping points now descending upon us and that highlight the perversity of a system that has brought us to the zero point of systemic collapse.

What would you do if you could mobilize thousands of connected protesters in cities all over the world? Send your best ideas for coordinated acts of civil disobedience to [email protected] and we'll share the most compelling ones in subsequent briefs.


To get the ball rolling here's a personal plunge you may want to take right away: Vow never to walk into a Starbucks ever again. Instead, search out the most interesting indie coffee shop around where you live and work … get to know the people who own and run the place and get your friends and co-workers to join you there. Individually this may feel like a drop in the bucket, but if all the 86,000 of us in this network do it collectively, then we can begin to shift power from megacorporations to our friends and neighbors.

This little shift in our lives is a good way to get in the mood … and during the week of rebellion in November, these indie coffee houses will become our meeting places and bases.

ACTION #1: #NOSTARBUCKS

A worldwide boycott of Starbucks.

In cities everywhere, we walk away from corporate java and into our local indie coffee shops instead.

Tweet #NOSTARBUCKS, Facebook it, email it, shout it from rooftops. Spread the word and send us feedback. Let's start brewing the mood for a worldwide revolution.

TARGET: 1 Million thriving indie coffee houses by November 28

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At last we’re in Winter. It’s the year 2047. A worn scrapbook from the future arrives in your lap. It offers a stunning global vision, a warning to the next generations, a repository of practical wisdom, and an invaluable roadmap which you need to navigate the dark times, and the opportunities, which lie ahead.

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92 comments on the article “Tactical Briefing #1”

Displaying 41 - 50 of 92

Page 5 of 10

Anonymous

This boycott is silly and trivial. As corporations go, it's hard to find one more benign than Starbucks. Enjoy your carnival rebellion.

Anonymous

This boycott is silly and trivial. As corporations go, it's hard to find one more benign than Starbucks. Enjoy your carnival rebellion.

Anonymous

I'm not sure if focus on small businesses is really that good economically. An indie coffee shop only needs a few employees, and any competition within a certain radius depending on the area would be killed off, resulting in a loss of jobs. What we need are stronger labor laws.

Anonymous

I'm not sure if focus on small businesses is really that good economically. An indie coffee shop only needs a few employees, and any competition within a certain radius depending on the area would be killed off, resulting in a loss of jobs. What we need are stronger labor laws.

Krs

Has anyone thought of all the poor coffee farmers in non-developed countries who will lose their livelihood when Starbucks stops buying their coffee beans?

And why is it always about Coffee in Seattle?

The coffee shop revolution era is over...It sounds much easier to hold meetings via Skype then to physically come together...

Get with the times

Krs

Krs

Has anyone thought of all the poor coffee farmers in non-developed countries who will lose their livelihood when Starbucks stops buying their coffee beans?

And why is it always about Coffee in Seattle?

The coffee shop revolution era is over...It sounds much easier to hold meetings via Skype then to physically come together...

Get with the times

Krs

Anonymous

I think you're missing the point. The point is not about creating a revolution to get with 'the times.' It's about creating disfunction in the present sphere of corporate capitalism and shaking up all of those who feel that it is essential to their survival to 'get with the times.' Besides, meeting in public spaces (in this case, indie coffee shops) isn't about destroying the lives of coffee growers in developing countries. It's about bring people together as a local community so that we know the people we live with. Also, have you done your research? Coffee growers in developing countries are completely exploited by corporations such as Starbucks. Their livelihood is now dependent on the very coffee giants you appear to support rather than on traditional means of survival those giants destoyed with their greed and disregard of human life. Presently, there may be elders in those communities who can re-teach the younger generation the skills they need to regain their cultural independence from Western corruption. If we follow your advice and 'get with the times', those 'developing' communites may lose a vital link to self sufficiency.

My challenge to you... Get with the times and join the revolution of individuals who seek to think before they speak the rhetoric of corporations who advocate the very complacency and acceptance of corporate rule you so effortlessly endorse.

Anonymous

I think you're missing the point. The point is not about creating a revolution to get with 'the times.' It's about creating disfunction in the present sphere of corporate capitalism and shaking up all of those who feel that it is essential to their survival to 'get with the times.' Besides, meeting in public spaces (in this case, indie coffee shops) isn't about destroying the lives of coffee growers in developing countries. It's about bring people together as a local community so that we know the people we live with. Also, have you done your research? Coffee growers in developing countries are completely exploited by corporations such as Starbucks. Their livelihood is now dependent on the very coffee giants you appear to support rather than on traditional means of survival those giants destoyed with their greed and disregard of human life. Presently, there may be elders in those communities who can re-teach the younger generation the skills they need to regain their cultural independence from Western corruption. If we follow your advice and 'get with the times', those 'developing' communites may lose a vital link to self sufficiency.

My challenge to you... Get with the times and join the revolution of individuals who seek to think before they speak the rhetoric of corporations who advocate the very complacency and acceptance of corporate rule you so effortlessly endorse.

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