Adbusters

Tactical Briefing #2

The second of a series of briefings leading up to the Carnivalesque Rebellion in November.

For twenty years, the culture jammer movement has been building momentum for a cultural revolution that will topple consumerism. Now Adbusters and our worldwide network of activists (now 86,590 strong) is calling for a Carnivalesque Rebellion this November 22–28.

Think of it as an adventure, as therapy, as Buy Nothing Day times a hundred … think of it as the World Cup of global activism – a week of postering and pranks, of talking back at your profs and speaking truth to power. Some of us will poster our schools and neighborhoods and just break our daily routines for a week. Others will chant, spark mayhem in big box stores and provoke mass cognitive dissonance. Others still will engage in the most visceral kind of civil disobedience.

In all, millions of people around the world will walk out of their schools, offices and factories for a week and LIVE!


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Tactical Briefing:

Adbusters Issue #91 Cover

When a culture reaches a dead end or when oppression becomes intolerable, the human spirit always rises up to jam the future in bold new directions. The current issue of Adbusters (which hits newsstands in North America, the UK, Australia/NZ this week) is a chronicle of some of history's greatest revolutionary struggles. And we draw inspiration from some of today's most inspiring radical thinkers and doers. Check it out on the newsstands, online or call us 1 800 663 1243 to subscribe.


Inspiration:

Shake your Bootie

If we don't free ourselves to be ecstatically tuned and happy, we may continue going to hell while taking the planet down with us. Bradford Keeney “If I Can't Dance It's Not My Revolution” From Adbusters #91.


The Love Police

Check out this inspiring street performance by The Love Police. Can we pull off spontaneous happenings like this in cities around the world in November?


Action:

Walk away from Starbucks

Last week we launched our first action: a worldwide boycott of Starbucks. We've since seen activists from New York to Mexico and Jordan take the first step by spreading #NOSTARBUCKS and deciding to walk into an indie coffee shop instead of a megacorporate chain.

There will be more actions down the road, and as November approaches a plethora of nasty corporations like Exxon, McDonalds and Nike will begin to feel the heat. But, for now, let's keep Starbucks in our sights and learn from the fight.

Together we can ratchet up this action and spread the meme worldwide. Some people can grab a marker and put a blackspot over the Starbucks logo or slap up a napkin with a cheeky note on the front door urging citizens to go local, while others spread the word via Facebook, Twitter, graffiti or zines. And in the places where Starbucks put our favorite cafes out of business, a few culture jammers can get a little bit more rowdy by disrupting the flow of the store for a moment with a Love Police action.

What do you think ought to be done? How can we pull off a global shift away from megacorporations in November? How can we turn capitalism upside down for a week? Let us know at [email protected]. We're also looking for a few hundred organizations around the world to collaborate with during this week long carnival, please send any names of organizations or individuals that would like to get involved.


ADBUSTERS #92 – Call for Submissions

In our next issue we offer an intimate call to action, setting the ground for the carnivalesque rebellion. Send us your inspiring stories. How were you politicized? What did it take to get you off the couch and into the streets? How did it feel to finally take your destiny in your own hands? What shall we do this November? Send your best wild whacks to [email protected]


Adbusters 111 Cover

On Newsstands December 3

At last we’re in Winter. It’s the year 2047. A worn scrapbook from the future arrives in your lap. It offers a stunning global vision, a warning to the next generations, a repository of practical wisdom, and an invaluable roadmap which you need to navigate the dark times, and the opportunities, which lie ahead.

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24 comments on the article “Tactical Briefing #2”

Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

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Anonymous

Does anybody know what a scratch awl is.You can plunge it into blacktop without a hammer with ease.And take out 3 inch or more chuncks at a time.But I would not suggest going back to the same spot again and again.A shark might bite you.Go for the gusto.Frank Sinatra

Anonymous

Does anybody know what a scratch awl is.You can plunge it into blacktop without a hammer with ease.And take out 3 inch or more chuncks at a time.But I would not suggest going back to the same spot again and again.A shark might bite you.Go for the gusto.Frank Sinatra

Anonymous

Interesting suggestion... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scratch_awl

Although, wouldn't want to be caught with that in your pocket... looks sharp!

Anonymous

Interesting suggestion... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scratch_awl

Although, wouldn't want to be caught with that in your pocket... looks sharp!

getting rid of ...

its a corporate goal and it will end alot of slavery when people no longer have to work but in return it will also end Liberal free thought and Capitalism which is why we have freedom from slavery also

cutting back on consumerism is a good Capitalist idea until better products are introduced but look out for matriarchy patriarchy and possessive humans who want their american dream "ho style"

thats what reactionary activism is so lame

its just another middle east war

getting rid of ...

its a corporate goal and it will end alot of slavery when people no longer have to work but in return it will also end Liberal free thought and Capitalism which is why we have freedom from slavery also

cutting back on consumerism is a good Capitalist idea until better products are introduced but look out for matriarchy patriarchy and possessive humans who want their american dream "ho style"

thats what reactionary activism is so lame

its just another middle east war

Anonymous

Can I ask a silly question? What is wrong with starbucks and megacorporations, bar pushing down the indie markets? Comments please :)

Anonymous

Can I ask a silly question? What is wrong with starbucks and megacorporations, bar pushing down the indie markets? Comments please :)

Tatsu

First of all, I think that is a valid question. I feel we are constantly rammed with simplisted, straight to the conclusion without reasons claims.

I think megacorporations are unfavorable to normal, non-rich people (99% of us) because of a number of reasons: they reduce salaries for the general population, reduce freedom of choice, and effectively can influence political and economic policies in their interests.

Reduction of salaries can happen when a company such as Wal-mart of Starbucks puts all of its competitors out of business. The competitors who lose their jobs are replaced by lower paid positions in Wal-mart. In other words, the bosses of the small businesses are now havin to find a job in the large corporations for less money. You may say that they can make similar salaries in these coorporations, but most successful coorporations are really good at minimizing salaries for just about everyone in their company except the very top.

Choice is reduced simply due to the fact that everywhere you go the only option is to buy from large chains. Walmart crushes local supermarkets, clothing stores, book stores, etc. Same can be said about other stores of the same type. Another problem is that stores like Wal-mart have a ¨family¨vision, blocking non-mainstream media such as movies, music, dissident magazines etc..

Powerful corporations can influence the laws and politicians in a government in a non-democratic way. What I mean by that is that a very small percentage of the populations (the corporate bosses) have a very big say in policy.

Tatsu

First of all, I think that is a valid question. I feel we are constantly rammed with simplisted, straight to the conclusion without reasons claims.

I think megacorporations are unfavorable to normal, non-rich people (99% of us) because of a number of reasons: they reduce salaries for the general population, reduce freedom of choice, and effectively can influence political and economic policies in their interests.

Reduction of salaries can happen when a company such as Wal-mart of Starbucks puts all of its competitors out of business. The competitors who lose their jobs are replaced by lower paid positions in Wal-mart. In other words, the bosses of the small businesses are now havin to find a job in the large corporations for less money. You may say that they can make similar salaries in these coorporations, but most successful coorporations are really good at minimizing salaries for just about everyone in their company except the very top.

Choice is reduced simply due to the fact that everywhere you go the only option is to buy from large chains. Walmart crushes local supermarkets, clothing stores, book stores, etc. Same can be said about other stores of the same type. Another problem is that stores like Wal-mart have a ¨family¨vision, blocking non-mainstream media such as movies, music, dissident magazines etc..

Powerful corporations can influence the laws and politicians in a government in a non-democratic way. What I mean by that is that a very small percentage of the populations (the corporate bosses) have a very big say in policy.

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