Adbusters

Osama!

Why are people dancing in the streets?

The assassination of Osama Bin Laden is a major historical event that many of us will remember for the rest of our lives, like 9-11 itself. As the world reacts spontaneously, and the public forms its opinion, nearly every mainstream commentator is openly rejoicing his death. Yet there are signs of dissent, a growing feeling that there is something deeper we are prohibited from saying. Here are a few people who are struggling to articulate that unsayable truth.

Chris Hedges:

"The tragedy was that if we had the courage to be vulnerable, if we had built on that empathy, we would be far safer and more secure today than we are .... Empire finally, as Thucydides understood, is a disease. As Thucydides wrote, the tyranny that the Athenian empire imposed on others it finally imposed on itself. The disease of empire, according to Thucydides, would finally kill Athenian democracy. And the disease of empire, the disease of nationalism .... I despair. I despair that we as a country, as Nietzsche understood, have become a monster that we are attempting to fight." Read More

Jeremy Scahill:

"I found it quite disgusting to see people chanting, like it was some sort of sporting event, outside of the White House. I think it was idiotic." Read More

Chris Douglas-Roberts:

A twitter war has erupted over basketball player Douglas-Roberts' skeptical comments about the assassination: "Is this a celebration? Is this the beginning of a huge religious war? It took 919,967 deaths to kill that one guy. It took 10 years and two wars to kill that guy. It cost us (USA) roughly $1,188,263,000,000 to kill that guy. But we #winning though. Haaaa. (Sarcasm)." Read More

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78 comments on the article “Osama!”

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Anonymous

It's not about the death. Bin Laden's death just symbolizes justice being done. If you think this it's wrong to celebrate the death of a murderer, wait until someone you know well gets murdered. The desire to dance on your compadres murderers grave will fill your soul like fire.

Anonymous

It's not about the death. Bin Laden's death just symbolizes justice being done. If you think this it's wrong to celebrate the death of a murderer, wait until someone you know well gets murdered. The desire to dance on your compadres murderers grave will fill your soul like fire.

Anonymous

I have many lives i know murdered by americans, so i have to fill my soul with fire by killing americans, right?? Ok, ill burn down Freeport HQ in Papua to a crisp...

Anonymous

I have many lives i know murdered by americans, so i have to fill my soul with fire by killing americans, right?? Ok, ill burn down Freeport HQ in Papua to a crisp...

Anonymous

Perhaps you don't know the difference between the word "murder" and "kill". There is an important moral difference.

Anonymous

Perhaps you don't know the difference between the word "murder" and "kill". There is an important moral difference.

Gimbal

On one hand, he was a leader in an organization that has directly supported attacks on free nations - not only the US, to be sure, but us too.

On another hand, it could easily be said that it would be gross to celebrate death, on any grounds. I believe that's the hand that I find myself closest to.

On a third hand, I don't know if his death is the only thing they may have been celebrating - if anyone was there, personally, out there to celebrate his death, at all, if.

Certainly, we can see the content of that one signboard, but does our own view of that necessarily represent everyone there? or anyone there? Whose view is it, again?

How are we relating to the event, itself, as consumers of images and of comments on the events?

I haven't really interviewed anyone about their intentions, in such rallies. I am certainly not one to jump to such assumptions.

My impression is that people are happy about it. That much seems easy to understand.

I'm not happy about the death, myself, but I know that mortality is a fact of life - and quite clearly so, for someone who so sets out to make aggression, let alone when it would be aggression directed towards, essentially, the entire modern world, and murderously so. Though he was certainly not on the planes that hit the WTC buildings, and not on the one that hit the Pentagon, and not on the one that went down in PA, he has clearly taken ends to support those who were, and those who would like to be. What kind of friend is that?

How do I relate to it? I am happy, simply, if we may be that much closer to finding a closure, globally, about the problems of terrorism - real and global problems, as they are.

I would like to ask the question, again: How are we relating to the events, as consumers of images and commentary?

Gimbal

On one hand, he was a leader in an organization that has directly supported attacks on free nations - not only the US, to be sure, but us too.

On another hand, it could easily be said that it would be gross to celebrate death, on any grounds. I believe that's the hand that I find myself closest to.

On a third hand, I don't know if his death is the only thing they may have been celebrating - if anyone was there, personally, out there to celebrate his death, at all, if.

Certainly, we can see the content of that one signboard, but does our own view of that necessarily represent everyone there? or anyone there? Whose view is it, again?

How are we relating to the event, itself, as consumers of images and of comments on the events?

I haven't really interviewed anyone about their intentions, in such rallies. I am certainly not one to jump to such assumptions.

My impression is that people are happy about it. That much seems easy to understand.

I'm not happy about the death, myself, but I know that mortality is a fact of life - and quite clearly so, for someone who so sets out to make aggression, let alone when it would be aggression directed towards, essentially, the entire modern world, and murderously so. Though he was certainly not on the planes that hit the WTC buildings, and not on the one that hit the Pentagon, and not on the one that went down in PA, he has clearly taken ends to support those who were, and those who would like to be. What kind of friend is that?

How do I relate to it? I am happy, simply, if we may be that much closer to finding a closure, globally, about the problems of terrorism - real and global problems, as they are.

I would like to ask the question, again: How are we relating to the events, as consumers of images and commentary?

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