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Buy Nothing Day ... Buy Nothing Xmas

Dreading the holiday season? The frantic rush and stress? The spiritless hours trapped in malls?

BUY NOTHING DAY 2009 WRAP

Zombies stalked the streets of Galway, Ireland while Michigan Whirl-marters confronted consumers with the proverbial question: What would Jesus buy? From Xalapa, Mexico to Valletta, Malta and New York, USA to Kyoto, Japan, people across the globe took part by simply opting out of the annual consumer spectacle. Some devoted the day to small personal challenges, while others joined Reverend Billy at the memorial for Jdimytai Damour, the man trampled to death at Wal-Mart last year in a bargain-hungry Black Friday crush. To all those who participated in this year’s observance, we commend you for taking a stand against the consumer culture that is killing our world.

The Copenhagen Climate Summit started Monday and it's imperative that the world leaders hear our message: There is only one sure way to stop catastrophic climate change: we, the rich one billion people on the planet, have to consume less!

So let’s take the joy and wisdom we discovered this BND and infuse the entire holiday season with the same sense of simplicity. Let this be the year that the spirit of Buy Nothing Day flows over into a Buy Nothing Christmas. Let us know how you are celebrating Buy Nothing Christmas: https://www.adbusters.org/bnxmas.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

From premodern to modern and postmodern to … altermodern? Adbusters’ first issue of the new year is an exploration of eras. As the rubric of postmodernism becomes less and less relevant, what are art, technology, philosophy, politics, activism and capitalism morphing into … and who’s doing the morphing? What is this still-to-be-named new era all about? Send your wildest thoughts to [email protected].

OPENING JAM OF THE YEAR

The American Economic Association is holding its annual general meeting in Atlanta from January 3-5, 2010. We'd like to be there to hand out copies of Adbusters #85 and debate with the neoclassical drones about the soul of economics, but it's a little too far for us. We're looking for two economics students in Atlanta who want to collaborate on bringing the spirit of ecological, humanistic and no-growth economics to the conference. If you're interested, contact us at [email protected].

Adbusters 111 Cover

On Newsstands December 3

At last we’re in Winter. It’s the year 2047. A worn scrapbook from the future arrives in your lap. It offers a stunning global vision, a warning to the next generations, a repository of practical wisdom, and an invaluable roadmap which you need to navigate the dark times, and the opportunities, which lie ahead.

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16 comments on the article “Buy Nothing Day ... Buy Nothing Xmas”

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

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Mar

Here's a question. Does buying and receiving books as Christmas gifts count as breaking the rules of Buy Nothing Day/Christmas. I'd argue no since there is a fundamental difference that separates fiction & non-fiction from brand name electronics, skinny jeans, & mocha lattes.

Mar

Here's a question. Does buying and receiving books as Christmas gifts count as breaking the rules of Buy Nothing Day/Christmas. I'd argue no since there is a fundamental difference that separates fiction & non-fiction from brand name electronics, skinny jeans, & mocha lattes.

Lauren A.

Lloyd,
The fact that the signs say "What Would Jesus Buy?" is in no way criticizing Jesus' character. In fact, it is using the mainstream religious figure that everyone in the U.S. knows a lot about to make a point. It is pointing out that Christmas is a religious holiday. By reminding consumers of the roots of the holidays, these peaceful protesters are trying to make shoppers stop and think about their own characters, and if buying all of these arbitrary and expensive gifts really matches the spirit of the holiday itself. These signs are not saying anything rude to believers, if anything they are championing the key figure of Christianity.

I also think you should take a second look at your war example. When soldiers go to war they are volunteering to risk life and limb. I don't think anyone goes to Wal-Mart on any day of the year expecting to risk anything except running into the occasional redneck.

Your reasoning is weak. I think it might be a good idea for you to turn on your filter between your mind and your mouth before you type any more asinine comments. You are only weakening the stance held by the people who do agree with what you are saying.

Lauren A.

Lloyd,
The fact that the signs say "What Would Jesus Buy?" is in no way criticizing Jesus' character. In fact, it is using the mainstream religious figure that everyone in the U.S. knows a lot about to make a point. It is pointing out that Christmas is a religious holiday. By reminding consumers of the roots of the holidays, these peaceful protesters are trying to make shoppers stop and think about their own characters, and if buying all of these arbitrary and expensive gifts really matches the spirit of the holiday itself. These signs are not saying anything rude to believers, if anything they are championing the key figure of Christianity.

I also think you should take a second look at your war example. When soldiers go to war they are volunteering to risk life and limb. I don't think anyone goes to Wal-Mart on any day of the year expecting to risk anything except running into the occasional redneck.

Your reasoning is weak. I think it might be a good idea for you to turn on your filter between your mind and your mouth before you type any more asinine comments. You are only weakening the stance held by the people who do agree with what you are saying.

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