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What We Can Learn from Hedge Fund Investors

Nate Hagens on what we can learn from hedge fund managers.

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he's completely wrong about human evolution and evolutionary psych (as a theory) has lots of holes in it. If he actually studied socio-cultural evolution he would know that arguably the most natural way of human life--hunter/gatherer society--was already (by far mostly) free from the kind of "natural competition" he's trying to assert is fundamental...

he's completely wrong about human evolution and evolutionary psych (as a theory) has lots of holes in it. If he actually studied socio-cultural evolution he would know that arguably the most natural way of human life--hunter/gatherer society--was already (by far mostly) free from the kind of "natural competition" he's trying to assert is fundamental...

Do you mean to say that competitive drive is a learned skill and not an inherent attribute? Because I mostly disagree; I've always been a very competitive person, but the competitive nature I feel is fluid. It can and has been redirected.

I agree with the post-structuralists on many points, and I know that the competitive drive varies somewhat between time periods and cultures, but I do think that some people are naturally driven to "succeed". Regardless, changing people's ideas of success/desired goals will be much easier than getting them to settle for what many of them feel is mediocrity.

Competition is not a bad thing if we are all competing to save the planet... It might be possible to raise a generation who had no desire to compete with each other, but that shift would take decades or even centuries. Instead, I think we should see the competitive nature of western cultures as a potential positive, a force that can be directed away from blind progress and towards the real, lasting benefit of the planet and our dependent relationship with it.

Do you mean to say that competitive drive is a learned skill and not an inherent attribute? Because I mostly disagree; I've always been a very competitive person, but the competitive nature I feel is fluid. It can and has been redirected.

I agree with the post-structuralists on many points, and I know that the competitive drive varies somewhat between time periods and cultures, but I do think that some people are naturally driven to "succeed". Regardless, changing people's ideas of success/desired goals will be much easier than getting them to settle for what many of them feel is mediocrity.

Competition is not a bad thing if we are all competing to save the planet... It might be possible to raise a generation who had no desire to compete with each other, but that shift would take decades or even centuries. Instead, I think we should see the competitive nature of western cultures as a potential positive, a force that can be directed away from blind progress and towards the real, lasting benefit of the planet and our dependent relationship with it.

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