Submissions

Let's Go Spend Some Money

Capitalism and consumption are satirically serenaded in the video "Fabulous Friends" by New York band Gladshot.

"Fabulous Friends" by Gladshot from matthew k on Vimeo.

16 comments on the article “Let's Go Spend Some Money”

Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

Page 2 of 2

Frank

Your comments strike at a fundamental problem with a lot of "anti-capitalist" agitprop, namely, many people who might benifit from the message would be alienated by the form it takes. On the other hand, an act like Dead Prez who is, so to speak, speaking the language of inner city youth (at least inner city black youth, remembering that there are other poor in the inner city), is not widely embraced by this cultural group. I suspect this is because the youth culture of the inner city is, let us not forget, part of the larger American culture. As such, it, like the larger culture, values aqusition as a means to identity and ultimately respect. Let us not forget that sales of gold jewlry, sneakers, big cars, etc, do not benifit the community that consumes it any more than the sales of pick up trucks, harley davidson T-shirts and any of the other signifiers of rural white youth. It must be granted that capitalism's most striking feature is its ability to rally those who suffer most from its corrosive effects to to support its agenda In the case of inner city youth the problem is, of course, compounded by the fact that living in need creates real needs that drive the "wants" for things that say "I am somebody". One reason that more educated white people embrace ideas like voluntary simplicity is that it is difficult to sell the virtue of austerity to some one who is not only poor but marginalized. Two things make the virtue of austerity salable; the first is freedom from real want (food, clothing, shelter, etc.) and second, a sense of self worth that comes from knowing that one's actions and abilities are the source of their worth as humans. Until these are addressed, whether in the inner city or rural Appalachia, no cultural delivery device, rock, hip hop, hillbilly, whatever, will have the effect of mobilizing people against their real oppressor.

Frank

Your comments strike at a fundamental problem with a lot of "anti-capitalist" agitprop, namely, many people who might benifit from the message would be alienated by the form it takes. On the other hand, an act like Dead Prez who is, so to speak, speaking the language of inner city youth (at least inner city black youth, remembering that there are other poor in the inner city), is not widely embraced by this cultural group. I suspect this is because the youth culture of the inner city is, let us not forget, part of the larger American culture. As such, it, like the larger culture, values aqusition as a means to identity and ultimately respect. Let us not forget that sales of gold jewlry, sneakers, big cars, etc, do not benifit the community that consumes it any more than the sales of pick up trucks, harley davidson T-shirts and any of the other signifiers of rural white youth. It must be granted that capitalism's most striking feature is its ability to rally those who suffer most from its corrosive effects to to support its agenda In the case of inner city youth the problem is, of course, compounded by the fact that living in need creates real needs that drive the "wants" for things that say "I am somebody". One reason that more educated white people embrace ideas like voluntary simplicity is that it is difficult to sell the virtue of austerity to some one who is not only poor but marginalized. Two things make the virtue of austerity salable; the first is freedom from real want (food, clothing, shelter, etc.) and second, a sense of self worth that comes from knowing that one's actions and abilities are the source of their worth as humans. Until these are addressed, whether in the inner city or rural Appalachia, no cultural delivery device, rock, hip hop, hillbilly, whatever, will have the effect of mobilizing people against their real oppressor.

Anonymous

haha oh yeah, I guess white people can't have cultural opinions. If they were rapping, people would call them posers. They're singing pop music, so I guess that means they're just pampered suburbanites complaining about something they can't possibly understand, right? Let's appreciate the message, not rag on them for the color of their skin and the sound of their tunes. Let's turn down the cynicism, yes?

Anonymous

haha oh yeah, I guess white people can't have cultural opinions. If they were rapping, people would call them posers. They're singing pop music, so I guess that means they're just pampered suburbanites complaining about something they can't possibly understand, right? Let's appreciate the message, not rag on them for the color of their skin and the sound of their tunes. Let's turn down the cynicism, yes?

Pages

Add a new comment

Comments are closed.