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Axe and Dove are both owned by Unilever…yet the two brands have very different views when it comes to women. A re-edit of this misleading company by Rye Clifton.

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I fail to see the problem in Unilever's decision to broadcast different messages to different audiences to achieve different ends. Sexual attraction is a fact, which is why it "sells." It would not sell if men and woman or men and men or women and women did not sexual excite each other. As for Dove's celebrated “Onslaught” work: I believe this a silly campaign built on a flawed premise. Unlike themes behind anti-drugs and smoking work, which inspired the form and content of this work, beauty may be the one universal concept. Whether it takes the form of a Cleopatra, a Jackie O, or a Kate Moss, men and women respond to beauty without the need for instruction. Yes, all these women are also social constructs, but the thing they have in common—from Marilyn to Twiggy to Naomi—is a certain glamour that's proves irresistible. Fashion may change from Couture to Prep to Punk to Green, but somehow the “beautiful woman” whether a Baroque plump beauty, or a pencil with breasts, is recognized is anointed and, yes, worshiped. Spots like “Onslaught” work only among the self-congratulatory circle that conceived, executed and produced it, and also apparently the award show crowd. In the end, however, beauty, whether it’s Aphrodite or Goldilocks or Philip Roth’s Shiksa Goddesses, will be defined by the beauties themselves. Yes, Virginia, there will always be beauties and those who aspired to their qualities, and who will do whatever it takes to achieve a semblance of it. Which may help explain why so many of the great beauty companies were founded by women. Beauty is an evolutionary adaptation, which signifies health, fecundity and, I suspect, pleasure. That we rarify or fetishize some of its features is entirely beside the point. As a man, I'm delighted women paint their lips and nails red, wear fragrance, have their hair done, and also watch their figures as closely as I do. Saying this, I think Mr. Clifton's spoof is self-regarding nonsense and probably made to get laid.
I fail to see the problem in Unilever's decision to broadcast different messages to different audiences to achieve different ends. Sexual attraction is a fact, which is why it "sells." It would not sell if men and woman or men and men or women and women did not sexual excite each other. As for Dove's celebrated “Onslaught” work: I believe this a silly campaign built on a flawed premise. Unlike themes behind anti-drugs and smoking work, which inspired the form and content of this work, beauty may be the one universal concept. Whether it takes the form of a Cleopatra, a Jackie O, or a Kate Moss, men and women respond to beauty without the need for instruction. Yes, all these women are also social constructs, but the thing they have in common—from Marilyn to Twiggy to Naomi—is a certain glamour that's proves irresistible. Fashion may change from Couture to Prep to Punk to Green, but somehow the “beautiful woman” whether a Baroque plump beauty, or a pencil with breasts, is recognized is anointed and, yes, worshiped. Spots like “Onslaught” work only among the self-congratulatory circle that conceived, executed and produced it, and also apparently the award show crowd. In the end, however, beauty, whether it’s Aphrodite or Goldilocks or Philip Roth’s Shiksa Goddesses, will be defined by the beauties themselves. Yes, Virginia, there will always be beauties and those who aspired to their qualities, and who will do whatever it takes to achieve a semblance of it. Which may help explain why so many of the great beauty companies were founded by women. Beauty is an evolutionary adaptation, which signifies health, fecundity and, I suspect, pleasure. That we rarify or fetishize some of its features is entirely beside the point. As a man, I'm delighted women paint their lips and nails red, wear fragrance, have their hair done, and also watch their figures as closely as I do. Saying this, I think Mr. Clifton's spoof is self-regarding nonsense and probably made to get laid.
Unilever cuts up and kills thosands of animals and then dove sells these products spiting out this message that is supposed to liberate you and make you want to support them. Not only that but they have been linked to using child labour. This was a very well done video :)
Unilever cuts up and kills thosands of animals and then dove sells these products spiting out this message that is supposed to liberate you and make you want to support them. Not only that but they have been linked to using child labour. This was a very well done video :)

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